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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to replace my circuit board in my 70
SS chevelle with the U-14 guage package . Is
this something I can do, or do I need a Dash
Doctor. thanks
 

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You should be able to do it. If you are uneasy about it, take notes and pictures before disassembly. It is actually a flex circuit not a board. Once you've got the gauge pod out, remove all the twist in lights, nuts that connect flex circuit to gauges, and two or three screws that hold flex to back of gauge pod (grounds). The flex circuit should fall off. It can go on only one way. Now just reverse disassembly procedure.
 

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Timbo, I asked a similar question a few weeks ago and got some very useful info from michael j. Check out my query on "original appearing tach's" dated 1/12/99 to see if there is anything you can use there. Good luck.
 

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timbo,

The actual act of get replacing the PCB is a cinch. The act of *GETTING TO* the PCB is not so easy.

What Steve S has described is very accurate. What he fails to mention is that you'll be working in extremely awkward contortions (head crammed up against windshield) with tight spacing for hands and tools. If you have one of those stubby ratcheting screwdrivers with a socket adapter you will really appreciate it now. When I did my 70SS conversion from light to gauges I had the luxury to have the entire dash out of the car. The job was much easier on the neck muscles that way, but a little more complicated overall. If you have a list of things that you want to do behind the dash, this might be a good opportunity to cover everything in one shot.

Final word, I put a light smear of di-electric grease on the exposed copper foil contacts. VERY light smear. I know that di-electric, by definition, doesn't allow current to flow. The grease is used here to help prevent corrosion. If anyone has a better substance to use for this purpose please tell me. I thought that I once heard that anti-seize (with the coppery appearance) is a good anti-corrosion agent and a good conductor. Anyone know for sure?

[This message has been edited by michael j (edited 01-21-99).]
 
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