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I am going to look at a chevelle this weekend. It has been owned by a friend that lives about a 1/2 mile away. He has had it, I would say for at least 15yrs. It is a 1970 chevelle. When he got it, the frame was cracked so the body was put onto a 71 frame. What i really just want to know is what areas should i pay the most attention too, such as know rust areas, frame, suspension, engine bay, etc. Obviously I am not worried about the originality of the car. I don't know too much about chevelle's so any help would be appreciated. If I do purchase it, I plan on making into an SS clone with a 502 engine. PS If you want you can respond by email to [email protected]
 

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Well, there used to be a "buying a Chevelle" article on this site. I couldn't find it though.

What I did was that I read thru as many "70 Chevelle" articles as I could before I bought my 70 earlier this year.

Check my web page for pics & work I have done so far.

http://www.wright.edu/~s001dga/chevy.htm

But all that aside, you are looking at a 30 year old car, so don't sweat the little stuff like suspension, brakes, wiring, interior, rust holes in front fenders, missing/inop air cond. OH, FANCY WHEELS DO NOT MEAN $#@! The engine/tranny had to be dependable for me (which mine was came out of 86 Camaro 350 with 700r4 tranny
).

But you can spend serious cash anywhere body welding is needed (trunk, rear quarters, roof).

I have seen that alot of Chevelles seem to rust in the trunk where water leaks thru rear glass at the corners, and in the rear of front fenders where water drains from the cowl area (look for old repairs). Ask if you can pull up carpet/trunk mat. Big warning buzzer
if he says no.

Fortunately my previous owner had metal replaced where it was needed. And told me about defects that I didn't see. I felt that told alot.

Look for restification upgrades, like front discs, HEI, tranny, rear end (you can id a rear from codes on passenger axle tube), bucket seats. Unless you are looking for full restoration, these things improve the value in my opinion.

In my opinion, if the main part of the body shell is solid, everything else is weekends and SS. Just to give you a base to go by, I paid $3,750 for mine, it is a North Carolina car, and in Ohio I thought it was worth it easily.

Let me know how it goes. Where are U located anyway, I might have a few parts to trade?
DG

Oh, by the way the 70 rear bumper is unique
to that year, and tail light lenses run $40.00 a piece. Mine is dented and 1 lense is cracked.
 

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DG- I couldn't find that article either I thought it was in the restro shop. I had copied it for an email when I was looking for a car and was inquiring for a 67 before I found my 64. Here's part of the email:

1. Does it have a motor(If so does it run? Also what size, type,
condition, is it original?)
2. Is the body straight or does it need bodywork? Any rust?(if so
where)
3.What year is it? (1967 right? Sometimes things get typed wrong)
4. Trans? Auto / Standard / column or console.
5. What is the interior like? Color, Condition..rips, buckets or bench.
6. How long have you owned it?
7. How many miles on the car?
8. How are the tires? What wheels or hubcaps?
9. Exhaust? stock or custom (headers)
10.Brakes? condition, disc or drum. Power?
11.How about Power steering?
12.Any options...? Air, power windows? tell me more!
13.Windshield Ok, or is it cracked?
14.What is the chrome like? (emblems grill molding etc.)
15.What does it have for a radio? any stereo?
16.Is it insured or registered? eg.. are you driving it?
17.Is the engine stock? (Any mods, please list)
18.WHY ARE YOU SELLING IT?
I know I deleted some lines of it for the email but that's a big chunk of that article.
Steve
 

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Watch the paperwork too. I bought a 71 model in Oklahoma three months ago and flatbedded it back to Texas. I was in such a hurry to get the rented trailer back to the rental yard before 5 o'clock, I didn't notice that the title was in both his and his ex wife's names. However, only he had signed the title. Well guess what, neither he nor the ex wife can be found now and I'm having to go through the procedure for obtaining a bonded title. Its about 300.00 dollars worth of extra paper work. Check the papers and signatures carefully. Make sure there is signature for each name on the title if it is in more than one person's name.

[This message has been edited by Randy Mosier (edited 12-08-98).]
 

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hey, steve, you left out the part about 'throwing a cat through the rust hole?'


I removed that article as I didn't think anyone used it.

al
 

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Hey Al,

I mentioned to the guy I was buying my car from about this list of questions to ask, when buying your Chevelle. He had heard about it, or a list that was similar. We kinda ran thru most of it, that wasn't obvious just looking at the car. I think that kind of info, especially related to a Chevelle, was pretty useful.


I read, or have read everthing on this site at least once. Might be a good idea to have some least used info archived in a "zipped" format. Download it if you need it. I'd suggest that the Whole archive section be done that way.

Great site, I load it at least 3 times a day.
DG
 

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The cracked frame part is interesting. This seems odd to me. But my question is not about the structure of the Chevelle; it is about the hassle of titles when you go from one state to another. Here in Arizona we have a physiical inspection for cars that come from another state and that includes the the frame number. Fortunately for me my out of state Chevlelles have been in compliance. If you know that the frame has been changed, you should have a copy of the title of the donor car or whatever the authorities need. Ask them before you pay money for this car.
 

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When I bought my 69 2 years ago, I wish I had paid better attention to the body and the frame. The mechanicals are alot easier and cheaper for me to fix; rust, dents, missing body parts , quality paint job have cost a bundle due to the added labor costs. Drive a car behind it and watch to see if the front and rear wheels track in line and there's no "crab walking" if you know what I mean. Could mean a bent frame. It's exciting to get one of these great classic Chevelles, I've had 4 over the past 20 years, still want more. Good luck. This site has been invaluable to me. These guys know alot and are generous with their time and wisdom.
 

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I purchased a '69 Elky SS in South Carolina six years ago. Being from Michigan, I had no idea how nice it was to work on a rust free car. Only way to go.
 

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Rust free ditto! Also having grown up on the streets of Detroit, Michigan it has been nice to work on my "semi rust free" '71 Malibu.

I would also consider the door hardware, hinges, play in the steering and the like to determine how used the car really is. Some of these sellers have ran the cars ragged with no real maintenance until the thing breaks. Others, who are constantly restifying their car offer a much better value (like mine) if they need to sell.
 

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Al,
I guess that was a rude shock seeing that some people used it ey?
It was very helpful in my quests for my Chevelle, Thanks. I bought my 64 soon sfter that email, and I'm loving every second of the chevelle experience, sure I wasn't even thought of when these cars were new but I can still enjoy the grins and thumbs up I get when cruising!
Steve Yes I'm a kid but at least I don't attempt to drive a rice rocket. Long live the muscle cars!
 
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