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Discussion Starter #1
So can it actually work for cars? Boats, bridges, under ground tanks I know it works, but there all grounded. What if you had a grounding strip?

If it were easy I am sure every car made would come with a zinc block attached, but they don't.

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Steve
 

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I thought that there was/is a sacrificial anode under the rear window trim on vinyl top cars.

New cars have their sheet metal zinc plated for that reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Most new cars are zinc plated or just plastic. With true cathodic protection you wouldn't need to plate the entire car. Just a zinc block attached to the car would protect the whole thing.

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Steve
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Just a zinc block attached to the car would protect the whole thing.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

And about a million years for the zinc to finally spread from that one block. To do this youd have to first plate the whole car in zinc then attach a sacrificial block about every 5 square feet

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Discussion Starter #5
You guys never do any chem experiments in High School. For cathodic protection to work the block only needs to be conected to the steel. The electrons travel from the zinc, through the steel. The zinc becomes oxidized because it is a beter reducing agent then the steel. This is how it works for buried pipes, boats, bridges, etc..

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Steve
 

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I thought Cathodics weren't allowed to wear "protection".

Now I find out it's a zinc block you have to bolt on. Woof.
 
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