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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen, I am trying to get the bumper bracket for the back bumper of a 69 SS coupe off, so that I can take the bumper to a chrome plating shop. Using penetrating oil, and a Johnsom bar ( I thinks some people call it a breaker bar ), anyway.....I can't get any of the three nuts to budge. Note, I got the ones out from the other end no problem. So, I am thinking the next step is to heat them up with the torch, but I don't want to do damage. I never heated anthing remotely close to chrome before. Granted, I am getting it replated. So, to torch or not to torch. Do I have other alternatives. Thanks for any consideration. R.B.
I do not have impact/air tools available.
 

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Maybe borrow an electric impact wrench, a dremel tool with reinforced cut off wheels will do it, might take a while on that one. If there not to hard, a hacksaw. Maybe a sawzall, nutsplitter.

You can get a piece or two of scrap metal and wedge in there to keep the heat down, but if its going to be plated, I don't think you will hurt it if your extra carefull.

Rob
 

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I'd go ahead with the torch. You might discolor the chrome or even burn it off, but as long as you don't blow a hole or warp the bumper you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

One thing though: If the chrome gets hot enough, it can generate some kind of toxic gas (can't remember exactly what it is), kinda like when you're welding galvanized steel. A friend of mine used to strip chrome on motorcycle parts with a torch, and he said that he could feel sick after working on it for a while.
 

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You want to heat the "fastener" side, not the "fastening" side. In other words, you want to heat the nut, not the bolt that threads through it. Are these the bumper bolts themselves that go through the square holes in the bumper?

If they are on the opposite side of the chrome plated surface, you can heat them and get them hot enough before the heat soaks onto the chrome and able to get them off. An impact wrench would be very handy for this.

In the end. Any good chrome plating shop can fix any sort of damage or blemish caused by the heating or melting of the bumper itself. So if you have to heat a bumper that will be plated later, you should be fine.
 

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Not sure what type of bolt those are, but on my 67 they are held on using "buton" bolts that have the square shape right under the head and fit into the square hole in the bumper. Thus they won't spin when you put the nut on. The problem is when you heat the bolt up you heat the bumper up and then everything becomes a little softer and you risk rounding out that hole. Just ask me how I know this.

I used a cut-off wheel on the other ones I didn't ruin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys, I'll get back to you. I have some real good ideas. BTW, the bumper is off the car, on my basement floor. While it solves the gas tank problem, it tends to slip all over the place on carpet. I have borrowed a longer breaker bar. I am willing to torch if necessary, just the bolt, and maybe some wet cloths on the chrome side. BLT4FN, thanks for the offer, might just get a peek at that frame? I will let everybody know of my triumph ( when it happens ) R.B.
 

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If the bumper is off the car, you really need an impact wrench. I tried the exact same thing you did once on a bumper for a 67 Lemans I have laying around with brackets still attached. Since I dont have compressed air at home, what a pain in the butt that was to get the "carrier" bolts off. I needed a few bolts for my 66SS and spent probably 2 hours on all the bolts and only 2 came off without breaking. Then I discovered they were not the right size for my 66 bumper after I got them off.

A lot of sweat and cussing went on that day, it was 90 out that summer day and we were trying to get them off by hand tools. Only to find out it was a complete waist of time in the end.:sad:

Sorry, I just wanted to share that story about my bumper bolts issue a few summers back. If you heat up the bolt on back and use an impact wrench, it should come off just fine. Using hand tools while preventing the bumper from turning with you is not fun at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Gentlemen, once again Team Chevelle guys with a lot of hands on experience and sharing their expertise. I sure appreciate it. The nuts and bolts ( and a few screws from the rear license light and front turn signals ) are all off. It took a combination of penetrating oil, I used "Releaseall" and Bow Tie's breaker bar, and my friend Bill the Old Master, not a Chevelle guy, but he can fix virtually anything mechanical, and the blue wrench. I broke one bolt. No damage to chrome as I kept the torch right on the nut alone. So, anybody know a good chrome shop near London, Ontario? I am told Cambridge has one. Thanks again. R.B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks again, bye the way, I meant "just the nut" not "the bolt" way back a few paragraphs ago. I heard Cambridge from my friend Steve who did a nut and bolt restoration on a 71 Mopar ( can I say that here? ) and he recommended Cambridge. Unfortuantely, he also said it was $ 1400.00 out the door. Here's hoping that old saw, "You get what you pay for is true." I have a long way to go on this Chevelle which is currently in the body shop. The way I work, it may be done two years from now. It once went down the road under its own power. That is now a fading, but fond memory. Thanks again. R. B.
 
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