Team Chevelle banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently installed a new cam in my engine block. It's the same as the one I took out, only newer. I lubed the lobes really good with GM EOS and I was just wondering how stiff it is supposed to be when I turn it manually? I don't expect it to turn as freely as the crankshaft, but I have to use a screwdriver as a handle(with 3 screws protruding from the end of the cam)to turn it. It's not like I have to really wrench on it to get it to turn, but I just wanna be sure.......


Spoileddaddy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,637 Posts
So you just have the cam in there, no timing sprocket/chain, lifters, or pushrods, right? Should spin easily by your fingers or even finger, something is wrong.
 

·
In Memoriam
66 El Camino 57 Chevy pickup 2004 Tahoe
Joined
·
29,419 Posts
oftentimes a little edge can get pushed up on a cam bearing during the install. the bearing surface of the cam bearings is very soft, you can cut it with a hard fingernail. I wouldn't sweat it. If you want to worry more precisely you can install it one section at a time, checking the turning resistance each time. That way you might figure out which bearing it is. Back in the olden days engine machinists used to do this and use a pocketknife to carve a little off any high spot on a bearing. Tidy, eh?

Bigger problem is your lube, EOS is an oil additive. If this is a flat tappet either hydraulic or solid you need to get some moly coat on it. It's a dark gray paste. Trade name is Moly-Kote. This is the first I've heard of anybody using EOS as assembly lube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,298 Posts
Just to add to Tom's comments,the eos is meant to go in the crankcase with the oil for additional cam/lift protection during flat tappet cam breakin.

And like Toms said eos is not for use on lobes/lifter faces,you should use the grey moly paste like crane sells for that.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, it was the #5 bearing causing the problem(wrong part in the kit), so I replaced it and now it turns real smooth by hand. However, and no disrespect, but I was going by the instructions on the bottle of E.O.S., quote: "Crank and Cam Bearing-Pour E.O.S. Assembly Lubricant over bearings and journals prior to installing crank and camshaft. Oil Pump-Fill oil pump cavity with E.O.S. Assembly Lubricant to facilitate priming. Piston and Ring Assembly- Liberally coat piston and ring assembly with E.O.S. Assembly Lubricant before installing into engine." and in BOLD lettering at the bottom: "GM recommends E.O.S. Assembly Lubricant only for the specific purposes listed above. GM does not recommend the use or any product as an additive to engine oil." And since I have been reading alot about the use of E.O.S. on these boards, and the fact it cost me $20.00 for a 16 oz. bottle, I followed the instructions to the letter. I also realize most of you folks have been doing this longer than me, and I truly appreciate the help and info, but as I said, I was following the instructions. Thanks again! (Sorry to be so long-winded......)


Spoileddaddy
 

·
In Memoriam
66 El Camino 57 Chevy pickup 2004 Tahoe
Joined
·
29,419 Posts
they are selling it as an "assembly lube" because it's ingredients supposedly are hard on catalytic converters. That why all the extreme pressure additives were removed from regular oil. Most modern cars have roller cams and don't need the extreme pressure lubricants anyway.

You'll notice it doesn't mention cam lobes in that paragraph. Bearings and journals are not lobes.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top