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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any of you guys have some good tricks for removing them? The one I might be able to weld a nut on to as part of it is still sticking out past the surface of the head. The other one is flat with the surface. I really, really DON't want to pull the heads off this engine. It's bad enough I have to reseal the whole thing.
 

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If welding a nut on doesn't work. Try and drill a little hole hole in it if you can get at it. Or a carbide burr if you can get at it, what you need to do is get some kind of an indent into it so the weld will stick.

Sometimes it has taken me five or six nuts to get a broken bolt out.

I use a 110 miiler mig, turn the heat up on ten, thats on high for the miller.

Wire speed about 50%, put the nozzle flush with the nut, after a second or two, back off and finish welding the inside of the nut flush.

Heres the secret, let it cool until it isn't red anymore. Then try to turn it just a tiny bit, and I mean just a little, then turn back and forth just a tiny bit at a time, it will feel like it isn't moving, but keep it up back and forth just a little, it will start to come loose.

If you can't get a little endent into it it doesn't matter, this will work, just keep welding more nuts on it, it will come out.

Rob
 

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The problem is that the threads may be causing the bolts to be stuck. Unless of course the bore inside the manifold hole has rust inside it, which could be very likely too.

Because the manifold is on, its very difficult to heat up the thread area and get them out. But if its rusted inside the bore section of the manifold, heating the manifold around the bolt may just work. In the end, you may need to just break or grind the heads off the bolts and try to get the manifold off, leaving "studs" sticking out of the head, then you can heat up the area (carefully) around the studs and get them out with a locking pliers like a vice grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The manifolds are off the engine right now. All the bolts came right out except one on each cylinder head. One was already broke, the other one I broke trying to back it out. Tere is no way to get any kind of tool that grips on the broken studs. One is flush with the head, the other sticks out less than 1/8".
 

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Once you finally get the broken bolts remvoed, go back with stainless steel bolts. This will permanently cure the problem.

On all of my engines, I use stainless bolts for intake and exhaust manifolds (or headers), water pumps, ps and air cond brackets. These are locations where there is frequently a possibility of rust occuring on the threads. :thumbsup:

Oh ya, I also use stainless bolts for the J-nuts that attach the front inner-outer fenders together.
 

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the flushed broken one ,I like to sharpen some drill bits so they cut in reverse, and it is easier to do them that way..
Then center punch a divit and start drilling in reverse ,,start with a small bit and get bigger untill it grabs ahold and backs the bolt out...

If it never comes out ,then you have a hole you can run a tap into to make some ney threads
 

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Drill it for an easyout. Use heat from a torch and penetrating oil. The heat pulls the oil into the threads.

If it's a cast iron head this is what I have done, But only if you are a PRO with a cutting torch. And only as a last resort.

Get a small tip in the torch and heat the bolt in the center, staying away from the head material as much as possible. After the bolt is straw colored, tap the oxygen and the broken bolt start to blow out of the hole. If you pay attention you can actually see the threads in the head appear. Keep tapping the oxygen until the majority of the bolt is out, let it cool completely. Then just run a tap through it to clean the threads. Since the cast iron dissipates the heat so quickly the theads will stay in good shape.

Like I said, if you have never done this before, don't try it on a good head. Get some practice first on junk blocks,heads, etc.
 

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First thing I would do is head up the area around the bolt. Then either use a candle or some penetrating oil. With the candle, stick it on the bolt and some will get drawn into the space between the bolt and head. If penetrating oil...spray liberally.

Second...get a six pack and kick back! :beers: :beers: :beers:

Third...try a center-punch and left-hand drill bits. Start small, make sure you stay in the center, check your depth from the other holes in the head, work your way up to the largest size you can get without getting into the threads on the head. Last, chip out and/or pull out the sliver of threads that are left in the bolt hole.
 

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While doing some of this...try Locktite's FREEZE IT OUT or something to that effect.
I used it the other week doing some suspension work. It freezes the rust causing contraction and lets penetrating oil in the spray get into the cracks....then when the part warms, the threads expand...more cracks in the rust for the oil to get into.
Made some tough bolts come out that refused gentle persuasion of 1/2" drive breaker bar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK....

The one that was broken flush is out. I drilled it with a very sharp 1/4" bit and used an easy out...done.
The other one that is sticking out of the head, I welded 8 nuts to, to no avail. That one is getting drilled and easyouted tomorrow night. I loaded it up with pentrating oil so it can work its way in overnight. I'm going to be using stainless steel bolts where I can on this when I put it back together. The only exception is where there needs to be studs for mounting accessories. The engine is out of an 84 Monte Carlo SS so it has all that smog BS and vacuum lines on it. They MIGHT find their way into the trash can instead ;).
 

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I wasnt aware the manifold was already off the car so I geared my post towards an installed manifold.
 

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OK....

The one that was broken flush is out. I drilled it with a very sharp 1/4" bit and used an easy out...done.
The other one that is sticking out of the head, I welded 8 nuts to, to no avail. That one is getting drilled and easyouted tomorrow night. I loaded it up with pentrating oil so it can work its way in overnight. I'm going to be using stainless steel bolts where I can on this when I put it back together. The only exception is where there needs to be studs for mounting accessories. The engine is out of an 84 Monte Carlo SS so it has all that smog BS and vacuum lines on it. They MIGHT find their way into the trash can instead ;).

Way to go, Tom! I knew you could do it! :thumbsup:


Respectfully,
John R.
 

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That welder definitively should do it, I know when I have done different bolts, the mig would turn the nut solid red, almost white. Maybe it was white, been a while since I took some out.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It was borderline white. It just wasn't getting a good enough bite on what was left of the broken stud and kept snapping off. I'm just gonna drill it out and use an easy out on it tomorrow night. Then I have to tear the engine apart and reseal it...fun stuff.
 

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Don't take this the wrong way, I'm trying to learn from this.

If you have part of it sticking out, how can the weld not stick to it, it seems like it would burn it off or weld it.

I just had a brain flash here, What if you took a thinner piece of brass and put that over the broken stud, then went with a larger nut, so you could get into the sides of it.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm not sure why the weld didn't stick, it should have by all means. I had the heat cranked all the way up and the wire speed set perfect so it just melted. I even took a grinder to the broken flat edge of the stud and hit it with carb cleaner so I know it was clean metal being welded too. The nuts I was putting on there would just start to thread too so there should have been enough plenty of meat for it to grab on to. I worked it just like a plug weld on sheetmetal, start in the middle and walk it out towards the edges. I'm done screwing around with the welder, I don't have the patience for nuts to keep breaking off. With the other one drilling it, I was done in literally 2 minutes while I was playing with welding 8 nuts on the other one for a half hour.
 

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Sounds like you got a good way to get them out with the drill, but this is a first for me that the welding failed, and you were doing it the same way me and others have, I learned something today, thanks Tom.

Rob
 
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