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Well, things are getting better! The last few times I drove my chevelle, the rear brakes plain SUCKED! Whenever I tried to bleed them I'd get nothing! Well, today I took out the brake lines and found out why!

When I removed the brake hose in the rear, nothing dripped! I looked and it was solid!!!! I then removed the line from prom valve to rear and first thing I noticed was the weight! It felt pretty heavy! When I got it out, it was 90% solid!!!??? I have never seen so much rust and crap in a brake system!

Well, all lines are new now and new pop valve. I went with right stuff detailing and got to say, I was a little surprised! The front to rear line was perfect but the lines that go to the calipers left much to be desired! The driver's side has the wrong fitting on one end and the passenger one is too long to fit along the crossmember!:mad: Not only that but I've emailed them twice and have yet to get a reply! And when you work on things at night and sleep during the day, it's hard to call for help! LOL

Oh well, after my motor predicament, this kinda of stuff just makes me laugh!!
 

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Hey ryan! That is EXACTLY why I made all of my own lines from scratch.
 

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I figure every 10 years i can can redo it. I love working on these old cars. I have yet to see any company accurately duplicate the correct bends or lengths for a truly hassle free direct fit. So far, i've done many brake systems all by hand. Also, you wouldn't need stainless unless you're planning on driving it in a lot of snow on salty roads.
 

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I made all my own lines also. The originals lasted for almost 40 years. If I get another 40 years on the new lines, it will be somebody elses problem by the time they rust out again.
 
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