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I know that there have been a lot of posts about installing stainless steel fuel lines,
but what are the pros and cons about installing stainless braided lines? Does the
body have to be lifted also? Is stainless steel better than braided? Any and all thoughts are appreciated.
 

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Do you mean just stainless steel, or the braided stainless steel? The braided is more like a rubber line shrouded in a stainless covering, much like radiator hoses that a lot of guys use. If you're replacing the front-to-rear line, I'd recommend using the stainless steel line instead of the OEM style lines. You'll never have to worry about them again. Company called "The Right Stuff" makes good lines that you might be looking for. As for installation, I did mine with the body off the car and still had a hard time snaking it into the frame rails. I've heard a lot of different opinions as to the frame of installation, but my opinion would be that unless you have a hydraulic car lift to get the whole frame and car high enough in the air to work with the line, take the body off. Better than kinking your $200 line. (Replace the body bushings while you're there, maybe a frame painting at the same time.)
 

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Steel braided hose will cost a fortune. You will need to be VERY CAREFULL when securing it to the frame, because the steel wire that makes up the outer sheath acts like a hacksaw on anything it rubs against.

I strongly advise using "hard" steel (stainless if you can afford it) tubing for 90% of the fuel line, with flexible hose only at each end, just like GM engineered it. There is no reason not to use a higher grade of hose, such as the teflon liner/steel outer braid, provided you secure it properly so it doesn't chafe on anything. Be aware that the teflon/steel braid hose is easy to kink if bent too tight, and once kinked it is TRASH even if it looks good on the outside! You CAN NOT straighten out a kinked teflon liner.

For me, however, I'm very fond of Aeroquip 332 rubber/fabric hose. Cheaper than the popular teflon/steel braid model 2807 hose, pretty blue, and if used with the matching Aeroquip barbed hose fittings, (much cheaper than the hose ends needed for the teflon/steel braid) does NOT need clamps to assure a perfect seal even with over 200 PSI.
 

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I just replaced the gas line on my car with stainless solid tubing. lifted the body gently off the frame on the passenger side.

I would think that using flexible hose around the shock bolts, coil spring top frame etc. would not be held in the proper place and could be pinched/broken as it jumps around between the line clamps.

The rigid tube is bent around like a pretzel in that area to avoid rubbing and touching stuff it shouldn't.

IMHO this is not a place to cut corners.

--Andy--

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1970 Chevelle SS Convertible
1937 Master Business Coupe
1996 S-10 Blazer
TC #551, ACES #3513
VCCA #35642
http://home.earthlink.net/~andypap/wsnC442.html
Yup, I'm Chevy Prejudiced!!!!

[This message has been edited by AndyP (edited 01-27-2000).]
 
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