Team Chevelle banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
For Engine:

I like stainless but have found that they do have a tendency to loosen over time. I bought an ARP stainless engine set and the headers, intake, watermneck, and accessorys would loosen every year unless I used a sealer or loctite.

Next time I'm using the ARP black bolts. I also like the black bolt contrast agaimst painted and chome parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,365 Posts
With the exception of where Grade 8 type bolts (such as head bolts) are required, I prefer stainless. If I want them to look REAL nice, I buff them with a buffing wheel on my bench grinder. If I want them to resemble a cad plated bolt (or nut or washer), I VERY lightly blast them.
THIS PUTS AND END TO RUSTED NUTS/BOLTS!!!!!:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,316 Posts
I l like to use 12 point stainless where ever I can. What I dont understand is why a standard stainless you buy from the hadware store is at best a grade 4.5 / 5. But the Arp 12 points are, I dont know they claim 188.000 lbs. I also noted that an Arp bolt can be picked up by a magnet. Try that with a regular stainless bolt.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
Mike:
You're exactly right about your magnet test. "Commercial" fasteners are typically Grade 5 which you'll often see listed as 18-8 stainless (18% chrome, 8% nickel) whereas the ARP bolts are most likely made from a 400 series that contains enough iron to be slightly magnetic. This is necessary in order for the fasteners to be heat treated so that the high tensile strength can be achieved.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
Cecilia,
The "Grade" refers to the strength of the fastener, and is defined as the amount of force it would take to tear it apart during a tensile test. It is expressed in thousands of pounds per square inch, therefore a bolt having a tensile of 180 ksi would be equal to 180,000 pounds per square inch. When you go to a hardware or home supply store you'll most likely find grade 3 or 5 (you probably won't even see it listed anywhere) whereas automotive applications rarely use less than grade 8. I hope this helps!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
At the hardware store, Grade 3 have no has marks on the head, only the manufacturers mark. Grade 5 have three hash marks, radially on the bolt head and Grade 8 have 5 marks. I agree that at the hardware store, grade 3 is most common. Better hardware stores will have the higher grades, but possibly in bins that are a little harder to find and they won't stock as many. There is a price escalation as the grade goes up as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
As I get older, (and I hope I do, cause the alternetive sucks) I am beginning to catch myself in different stages of collecting things, without being totally consience of the true meaning of the act.
I recently purchased a new $30 tackle box, the kind with 3 seperate boxes and several individual compartments.
I then, over a 3 month period, began to amass a huge collection of stainless and chrome trim screws, an washers, fender washers, button head, allen head and hex head bolts and nuts of all sizes. Not to mention,...several types and brands of polishing compounds and a dual buffing wheel.
Thank God,......my family recognized this strange behavior, got me the proper medical help.
I, Friends, have been afflickted with and since labled as "Shiny Stuff Dependent".

blksheep...I really like stainless, but have been known to wet myself over fresh chrome plating...in Charlotte
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
276 Posts
well, right now I have a very large box of all kinds of nuts, bolts, screws, and fasteners to go through, clean up, and try to sort out.

Imagine all of the above items from a 70 that has been completely dissasembled in one big box, and that's what I got :(

Don't know if I'm going to re-use allot of them when I go to reassemble the car or buy new bolt kits. another problem is that I have every 70 chevelle book I could possibly buy and none of them give accurate descriptions of the bolts, screws, etc so finding out where they all go would be a nightmare.

I'm going to soak them all in rust remover, clean them up, and try to sort out what I can, but it's mission impossible :(
 

·
Gold Founding Member
Joined
·
10,970 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,223 Posts
For engine fasteners and other important parts, you need automotive grade stainless. I see most of you already know that.

FYI, the grade 8 bolts have 6 radial marks on the head, two less than the grade of the bolt.
 

·
Gold Founding Member
Joined
·
10,970 Posts
FYI, the grade 8 bolts have 6 radial marks on the head, two less than the grade of the bolt.
Absolutely correct. One problem is the substandard 8.2 bolts ALSO have 6 marks on the head, although in a slightly different pattern.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
533 Posts
I worked at a major airline for over 30 years, and whereas the bench stock everyday nuts and bolts were stainless (but not polished), the really high tensile strength bolts were not. The high strength bolts used to hold engines, pylons, landing gear, etc on, are very subject to corrosion. Things are not always as they appear !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
THe really critical bolts that need to be grade 8 are the bolts that hold the PS and Alt brackets on units on. Some may disagree but the intake bolts are not in high stress area. I have a friend that tried grade 5 bolts on the brackets and snapped his Alt bolt every time he reved the engine over 5800 RPM. Changed to grade 8 and had no problems after that. My 454 came with grade 8 bolts in those areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,365 Posts
As I mentioned earlier, I DO USE grade 8 where it is essential, such as head bolts and other critical locations. Otherwise, I use stainless almost everywhere else--------------------ESPECIALLY IN AREAS WHERE THERE IS A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR RUST! A good example of this is body mounting bolts. To hell with what is original or correct-------------------I DON'T LIKE FIGHTING RUSTED FASTENERS IN THESE AREAS. Also, another area where I have consistantly found rusted fastener problems is the bolts that attach the inner-outer fenders together along the wheel openings. Stainless bolts permanently cure this problem. Again, to hell with what is correct! Bolts around the battery tray, radiator core support, etc are just other examples. If you want the stainless bolts to have a cad or zinc appearance, then lightly blast the bolt heads (or nuts, washers), or, blast them and then lightly hit them with a good semi gloss black paint (a blasted part holds paint very good). But regardless, stainless fasteners are the answer for avoiding rust.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top