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I am at the point in my frame off restoration where I am trying to get the brake system to work. The car is a 69 SS with 396 and power brakes (disc in front as should be). I put a new master cylinder in and am trying to get brake fluid to all wheels but have not had any luck with the rear wheels. The system has a metering valve that sits next to the master cylinder. The car is not running yet.
I open bleeder valve on wheel cylinder, push petal to floor, close bleeder valve, let petal return and repeat. No luck. What am I doing wrong and suggestions please? Thanks.
 

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Did you bench bleed the master cylinder before installation? If not that is the place to start. Most master cylinders come with instructions on doing this.
 

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Another problem I see in your info is the order.
Push and hold the pedal first, then open the bleeder allowing the pedal to go down. Next close bleeder, last release pedal.
pump the pedal a time or two before starting this procedure again.
 

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Definitely bench bleed the master cylinder first. Then, bleed each wheel in this order. Pass side rear, driver's rear, pass front, driver's front. Now, for a trick I learned for saving time, and also convenient when working alone. Get a glass jar and a piece of vacuum hose, or aquarium air line tubing. Connect the hose to the bleeder screw, put it into the jar, and open the bleeder. Make sure the hose isn't all the way in the bottom of the jar, or it'll impede flow. Remove the master cylinder cover, and carefully press the brake pedal once, and once only. Do it too fast, and you'll be cursing all the brake fluid on your headers, paint, etc. Next, go do something else for a couple of minutes. Let gravity do the work. Make sure to keep an eye on the master cylinder, don't let it run dry. When you've drained out a couple of ounces into the jar, close the bleeder screw, move on to the next wheel. Put the hose on, open it up, and it should flow on it's own. Same thing, move on when you're done. It's much easier this way, and you don't have to yell when someone doesn't know how to work the pedal. This is also a good way to change out brake fluid, just let it drain longer. It works for me, I do it every time I do a brake job, has never failed once, to give me a firm pedal the first time. Darren
 

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Darren,
Do you have to hold the pedal to the floor while gravity is doing the work for you?
Phil
 

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I have also used the gravity method and it works well for any car with the master cylinder mounted high. The brake pedal is never depreseed using this method.(although I do not know if it is truly happy)
 

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yuk-yuk, give me a brake...Tom, you've gotten some good advice already, but I might be able to save you from pulling your master for a bench bleed or waiting on that darned gravity. If you've got access to a vacuum pump, hook it up on one of the rear bleeders and pull the fluid thru. Use a catch jug between the pump and the bleeder though, some pumps don't like brake fluid.
Good luck, Bryan
 
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