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1969 Grand Prix. 455 TH400 12 bolt.
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Some shops have a frame wrench. Thats the tool made for this. Best results if small bites are taken and jaws are of sufficient depth.

Handwriting Human body Gesture Font Finger


I threw an interpretation of the 2x4s approach in there.

If the car was on a lift and a guy had a pogo stick he could make short work of it like so then finesse gently with a 3 lb mini sledge.

Human body Art Knee Font Painting


Once the metal stretches its tough to make it look like nobody has ever been there but yep the steel ain't tough to manipulate. It takes both body and frame to make enough tough to call a Chevelle.

As stated, you ain't hurt it. And I'd wager you won't reattempt that stunt anytime soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks you guys! Matt, I really appreciate you talking the time to draw out the diagrams and explain everything! May take it to a body shop who would probably do a better job than me to make it as straight as possible. Even though this is cosmetic, would it effect the value at all or is it a non-issue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Got some of it pulled down with a crescent wrench but will not use that anymore as it's not even, high and low spots. There is a metal line that runs inside that frame rail so can't get all the way inside.
 

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1969 Grand Prix. 455 TH400 12 bolt.
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Thanks you guys! Matt, I really appreciate you talking the time to draw out the diagrams and explain everything! May take it to a body shop who would probably do a better job than me to make it as straight as possible. Even though this is cosmetic, would it effect the value at all or is it a non-issue?
No sweat, it would have taken longer to type out. 5 minute draw.

Value? I'm not the right guy for that question but with the current price scale I'd call it negligible. A possibility exists that dimensions became altered but I'd consider that to be the same way. The personal eyesore factor would be more my concern. In any case, after a fix, restoring adequate corrosion protection is important. By that I mean shuck the crusty stuff and shoot some fresh paint on that rail. You'll like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Closing that C frame with 4 sides wouldn't have added too much more weight and I imagine would have made it that much more structurally sound and nobody would have to worry about something like this. Anyway, the important thing is it's only cosmetic.
 

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1969 Grand Prix. 455 TH400 12 bolt.
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As I said... I think if so it would be a non-issue amount and if you follow through with your fix there would be no cause for second thought. The upright side of the C is what establishes the dimension and anything you do will still fit within the range of stock variation. But yeah if you dent one side of a cardboard box, that side is shorter. Unbend yours and no worry. Its not hurt bad enough to likely have affected thrust angle or wheelbase. If after a fix, a straightedge lays flat along the rail as it does on the opposite side... you're good to go. If not, fix it some more. It would take a lot more than that to affect wheel alignment or panel fit. Something like that might raise one side of a trans xmember if closeby.

Bend it back nicely, paint it. Thats all that needs to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Ok, appreciate it; that makes perfect sense. Seems like the main issue is whether the top of the frame rail became distorted due to the bend on the bottom. May have a professional do it. Haven't checked the body mounts close by. would I be able to tell if the top of the frame rail was tweaked by looking at those? What would I be looking for? Thanks
 

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You'd be looking for evidence that the body mount bolt has scooted over and stayed. Like in the witness marked dirt around the rubber or washer. Not likely to find any of that, IMO. You just smushed it, real damage requires more of a smash.

I don't think the top bent. A way to roughly check would be to stick a magnetic level under the other rail then use a jack to raise the front end of the car until the bubble says level then stick it on or inside the bent rail to compare.

Of course if you are gonna crawl under, you'll need it level on stands which is way more trouble. But if you get rails parallel with a flat shop floor and can lock your tape measure with the tab hooked over top of rail then slide it along the rail looking for consistency, theres a way. Very approximate, but telling.

But seriously. If you can see the top of the rail looking across under the other side of car, you could hold a ruler between your eyes and the rail ("rifle sighting it") and see if you see a bend. As you can tell, theres no need to split hairs.

Body-on-frame cars are forgiving. Dimensional specs are within a range double the size of modern cars if not more. I can jack up my 99 unibody up like that and raise the whole side, its rigid. 69s ride better because theres flex and slop. Most old car folks know to only jack up theirs from one end or the other but not from the side and now that includes you.
 

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I have a Utica Tools adjustable wrench (or Crescent wrench to some) that's about 14 inches long and opens up to about 1 1/8".I open it up to just about an eighth of an inch (1/8) like in the drawn out pictures (in post #23) and use it to bend thin steel like frame rails and lots of sheet metal too.I have also used it to bend out dented steel wheels for over 25 years so I know a similar tool will do the same type of job.
 

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"Possibility dimensions became altered" concerns me....Need to take frame measurements?
When I first looked at your pic I thought it was rusty. Then I saw the perfectly round body mount hole and decided it was flaking paint or undercoating. Rust always attacks those holes and they end up oversize and egg-shaped. Don't sweat it, you haven't hurt anything.
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Great information! It sat overnight jacked up in that area. Frame has no cancer. I had the jack stand adjacent to the floor jack. Does the amount of time matter, or is that inconsequential? I'll jack it up under the front cross member until the bubble on the level is center on the other side then put it inside other frame rail. Of course will need to ensure both rear tires have exactly the same air pressure or results would be inaccurate. Would not have thought of rifle sighting with a ruler but makes sense. check if the top of the frame rail stays even across the length of the top of the ruler. Will also do the tape measure slide technique. Going to inspect the body mount bolts for shifting also.
 

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Great information! It sat overnight jacked up in that area. Frame has no cancer. I had the jack stand adjacent to the floor jack. Does the amount of time matter, or is that inconsequential? I'll jack it up under the front cross member until the bubble on the level is center on the other side then put it inside other frame rail. Of course will need to ensure both rear tires have exactly the same air pressure or results would be inaccurate. Would not have thought of rifle sighting with a ruler but makes sense. check if the top of the frame rail stays even across the length of the top of the ruler. Will also do the tape measure slide technique. Going to inspect the body mount bolts for shifting also.
The 4 corners of the frame are "boxed somewhat" and are much stronger than the center area's of the frame so a good look with a flashlight along with some feeling with your paw will show you where to put your floor jack.
 
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