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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that the snow has finally melted. I could use some advice on BBQ'ing. I know a few things here and there. Always pre-oil the grill before cooking meat to help prevent sticking. Steaks are only flipped ONCE during cooking on the grill. Do not press on the meats. Thats about all I know at this point. The rest of the time I just make sure its not raw inside when im done cooking.

Case in point, tried cooking some chicken breasts this weekend and even though I used oil on the grill before hand, the chicken still stuck to the grill. How do you prevent this? I would be intrested in some recipes for sauces, marinades or anything not to mention some pointers here.
 

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With chicken, I use a PAM or a non-stick spray on a clean grille.

Start cooking on the LOWEST heat, and turn frequently for the first 10 minutes! That there's the trick.
Actually, if you want the absolute best cooked, fall off the bone chicken, pre-cook it in a baking dish at about 220 degrees for a 1.5 to 2 hours. THEN, baste and place on the grille for flavor and to carmelize the sauce.
 

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I never grease the grill. It usually just burns off when you heat it up and I really heat it up when I'm cooking steaks. Besides there's usually a nice layer of grease on there from the last time I used it.

Steaks, very hot grill. Try to sear the one side then flip it over and sear the other. Seals in the juices. Hamburgers, about the same but maybe not as hot as a steak because they usually have more fat, more fat = more flames. I do press the burgers some to get some of the juice out. If you don't it seems to take a lot longer to cook through, unless they're very low in fat content.

Chicken, very low heat and slow cooked. Chicken burns easy, way before the meat is cooked.

Pork chops, medium heat. They don't burn too easy and cook pretty quickly.

Sausages, usually boil them some on the stove first. If not they take a long time to cook through and can get dried out by the time they're done.

Teriyaki sauce is good marinate for skinless chicken breasts and pork chops. Seems to seal the meat and keep them moist. Sweet Baby Ray's bbq sauce is good for chicken, mixed with a little beer doesn't hurt either. Steaks, marinate in Italian dressing for a few hours. Poke the steaks with a fork all over and flip them over and do it again. Lets the dressing get down into the meat. The vinegar tenderizes the meat and the Italian spices add a good flavor. A little Mrs Dash's seasoning is good on any meat, no salt either for those that have to watch their salt intake. Italian seasoning is really good on beef roast.

As for sticking to the grill, I'm just use to it and expect it. I usually just stick the fork tongs down into the grill and slide it along under the meat to loosen it up. I don't know if there is anything you can put on the grill that will stop it from sticking. Probably wouldn't work for me since I turn the grill on high to burn off anything left from the last time. Oh, side note. Leave the grill open when you're down until it's completely cooled down. They say if you close it up before it's cooled it will collect moisture inside and rust out the parts. Don't know if it's true but that's what I've heard or read somewhere.

EDIT: Just saw Jimmy's reply. Reminded me about ribs. Cut them into sections, coat with bbq sauce, wrap in foil and leave them in the fridge overnight. Cook in the oven, 300 for like an hour, can't remember since that's my wife's part. Then just brown them on the grill maybe adding a little more sauce. Carefull, they'll fall off the bone when you're grilling them.
 

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Turn down your heat a little. I have never oiled the grill on anything I've cooked. I would also add that one needs to learn their grill. I have two, and they cook very differently from each other.

Start by turning down the heat. I like chicken breasts cooked where it takes 7 to 10 minutes a side. Chicken needs to be cooked through but still stay moist, so a little slower is better; works in your favor. Cut into it if you need to and figure out what is going on is more important that watching the clock. Dark lines from the grates are okay. Once you master chicken, pork and steaks will take about the same form the same thickness or even a little slower. But with steaks, use less time to get rarer meat which will make it more tender.

Alternatively, cook on the top rack. i have friend that cooks everything on high, on the top rack. It does two things. 1.) any flare ups don't scorch the food. 2.) A little distance from the heat moderates the cooking temperature.

Vegetables on high heat: Potatoes and vidalia onions, douse with olive oil or a pat of butter add pepper and season salt and double wrap in foil. Turn 4 times in one hour. Corn on the cob, husk it, pat of butter w/salt and pepper, wrap in foil -- 20 minutes and turn to all four sides every five minutes. Fresh peas, mushrooms, or can of baked beans -- high heat in an iron skillet stirring occasionally. Green bean casserole take about 30 minutes on high heat. Get it boiling and frothy, stirring often before adding the onion crunchies. Rub the outside of any pans with liquid soup to make them easier to clean off the soot.

Marinades: Italian oil dressing is my favorite. Let the meat sit 24 hours, add pepper and garlic and grill. I get more compliments on this than anything else. Lemon and a little olive oil with lots of black pepper is great on chicken or steak; especially if you have no time to let the meat sit. Cider vinegar, ketchup, brown sugar and season salt is a nice pork or beef marinade - 24 hours. Pulpy orange juice and a little balsamic vinegar shaken vigorously is good for chicken -- but is sweeter -- also 24 hours. For fish, I like olive oil , a couple of slices of onion and rings of lemon or lime all along the length of each fillet. Slide it off with the spatula, turn the fish, re-oil and lay the onion/citrus back on top. Barbecue sauce right out of the bottle is good on chicken or pork. I like Sweet Baby Ray's, but really anything will work.

Marinade tips: If you want it to taste "meatier" use fennel and caraway and little Worcester sauce. Oregano and basil will give an italian flavor, good for serving with marinara sauce. For Asian influence, use ginger, soy, citrus and crushed peanuts.
 

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Matt is right. Just let the meat sit a while longer. I always start breasts and thighs skin side up so that the fat that drips doesn't burn the skin. Since I use charcoal I usually put the lid back on the grill which cools the coals a little.

For ribs, use indirect heat.
I prefer rubs to marinades for ribs but will use wine in the liquid pan below my ribs. Add some onions, celery and Cajun spices and it imparts a nice flavor to the ribs.
 

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Steven Raichlins "BBQ USA" - grab a copy.

One of my bibles for the grill. First day I got it about 4 years ago I just sat and read. Its like the factory assembly manual for Chevelles. Lots of basics, lots of in depth techniques, TONS or recipies and sauces.....covers it all. Good to have in your book stock, for sure.

I dont do any pre-cooking or par boiling for any meats. All on the grill, just have to get the heat right, be patient, know what needs indirect or direct cooking, know when to use a smoker box, when to use gas when to use coals.....

Best cookbook I have ever bought to date.
 

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Are you putting the meat on the grill before it's fully warmed up?
That'll cause sticking. You want a good sear not only to seal in flavor, but also to create a barrier on the outside of the meat to not stick.

As unhealthy as it is, a higher fat cut of meat makes for better grilling.
 

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Are you putting the meat on the grill before it's fully warmed up?
That'll cause sticking. You want a good sear not only to seal in flavor, but also to create a barrier on the outside of the meat to not stick.

As unhealthy as it is, a higher fat cut of meat makes for better grilling.
If we were worried about healthy we'd be eating fruits and vegetables instead of trying to figure out how to grill meat while drinking beer.:D The drinking beer part goes with trying to figure out how to grill meat and actually grilling the meat once you've figured it out.:beers: Of course it's not limited to just those 2 occasions.
 

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In about another two weeks I can throw the steaks out the back door and they'll cook themselves. :D
 

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Get a smoker. Nothing like smoked meat. I get those big ole country style pork ribs, dry rub of your choice and smoke them for several hours at 230 -260 F. To die for. Sausages and pork loin roasts do well also. Briskets are big here in TX.

For grilling, it's just the Weber and charcoal.
 

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In about another two weeks I can throw the steaks out the back door and they'll cook themselves. :D

Dave...I tried that with eggs in a pan on the street in front of the house last summer...when it was 117 degrees out. It took forever to make scrambled eggs:D


The secret to not having your food stick on the grill is to slide it around on the grill when you first put it on...Works every time!:hurray:
 

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1st of all, what kind of grill??

If it's fired by some kind of gas, I'll give you my pity and leave you to eating the in-edible flavorless by-products of putting prime meat on a convenience fire.

If you are using a charcoal fired grill, then there's some help for you.
 

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1st of all, what kind of grill??

If it's fired by some kind of gas, I'll give you my pity and leave you to eating the in-edible flavorless by-products of putting prime meat on a convenience fire.

If you are using a charcoal fired grill, then there's some help for you.
I respectfully disagree. The flavor comes from the drippings of what you are cooking on to a "Heat Source", hence making smoke which translates to flavor. Gas or charcoal, thay are both a heat source. If you are getting a different flavor from charcoal, it's either because the lighter fluid has not all burned off or you are using an impregnated charcoal, IE mesquite charcoal or the like. There is no flavor add from cooking on charcoal providing the charcoal is white hot as in ready to cook on as it needs to be !

That's my opinion and some here know that i'm in to food and cooking.

Bon Apitite,

-Garry
 

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I respectfully disagree. The flavor comes from the drippings of what you are cooking on to a "Heat Source", hence making smoke which translates to flavor. Gas or charcoal, thay are both a heat source. If you are getting a different flavor from charcoal, it's either because the lighter fluid has not all burned off or you are using an impregnated charcoal, IE mesquite charcoal or the like. There is no flavor add from cooking on charcoal providing the charcoal is white hot as in ready to cook on as it needs to be !

That's my opinion and some here know that I'm in to food and cooking.

Bon Apitite,

-Garry
Your exactly right Gary, but you have to get a nice grill that's designed to vaporize the drippings as they come off the meat..Not all gas grills are created equally...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If your chicken is sticking, you are trying to flip it too early.
Matt is right. Just let the meat sit a while longer. I always start breasts and thighs skin side up so that the fat that drips doesn't burn the skin. Since I use charcoal I usually put the lid back on the grill which cools the coals a little.

For ribs, use indirect heat.
I prefer rubs to marinades for ribs but will use wine in the liquid pan below my ribs. Add some onions, celery and Cajun spices and it imparts a nice flavor to the ribs.
Thats exactly what I was thinking when they started sticking and I flipped them anyways. Next time I will leave them on for a little while longer before I flip.

Steven Raichlins "BBQ USA" - grab a copy.

One of my bibles for the grill. First day I got it about 4 years ago I just sat and read. Its like the factory assembly manual for Chevelles. Lots of basics, lots of in depth techniques, TONS or recipies and sauces.....covers it all. Good to have in your book stock, for sure.

I dont do any pre-cooking or par boiling for any meats. All on the grill, just have to get the heat right, be patient, know what needs indirect or direct cooking, know when to use a smoker box, when to use gas when to use coals.....

Best cookbook I have ever bought to date.
I have been looking for something just like this for a while now. I will have to check out local bookstores and see if I can find or order it.

1st of all, what kind of grill??

If it's fired by some kind of gas, I'll give you my pity and leave you to eating the in-edible flavorless by-products of putting prime meat on a convenience fire.

If you are using a charcoal fired grill, then there's some help for you.
I do it the Hank Hill way and use gas but I do have a Weber charcoal grill that I sometimes use too. I dont have a problem using either personally. Someone brought up smoking meats, thats another thing I have been wanting to try out too.
 
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