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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, back to the basics.
What does a voltage regulator really do?
Is it required?

Why is it that I can connect accessories directly to the battery thru a fuse and a switch, which is receiving 14-15volts, without any apparent damage/problems? Seems like 14v should be too much???

I've connected an aftermarket fuse panel source wire directly to the battery, which means the fuse panel is recieving 14 volts while the alternator is working. Any problems I should expect with this?

Also, How does one hook up an alternator gauge to monitor the voltage? Hook directly into the main alternator wire? to the battery?

Thanks,

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Gold #178
aka Tailspin on IRC Chat
 

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Voltage is potential energy. Energy flows from the greatest potential to the least. Sort of like **** runs downhill, as plumbers say. Since a battery is normally at 12 volt potential, the alternator must charge above this, usually 14 volts. The regulator varies the field voltage fed to the alternator which controls the charging rate, or voltage output of it. You can hook up a voltage gauge to about any bigger sized wire in the system. Most accessories are built with a voltage regulator built in to protect it from surges, etc. tom
 

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One further suggestion. Use a fuseable link at the + battery connection for your aftermarket fuse panel. Without it you have a "feed" wire that is unprotected and therefore a potential fire hazard.
 
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