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Hello I am new to the classic car world, I just bought a 66 el camino, lots of work to be done but has great bones. I was wondering if anyone could help out a young buck/newbie. My power steering pump is leaking and I am trying to decide if I rebuild, buy a new oem part, or buy a remanufactured part? Cheers!
 

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Welcome to Team Chevelle! I am under the impression that rebuilts are a crap shoot! If it is not leaking bad, I would certainly try some Lucas Power steering stop leak. I have had a few cars benefit from Lucas over the years, it's a cheap band-aid that usually gets results. If it is really shot- try a local parts store. Napa seems to have better quality than say Autozone- in my opinion. And congrats on the ELCO!
 

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Welcome to Team Chevelle! I am under the impression that rebuilts are a crap shoot! If it is not leaking bad, I would certainly try some Lucas Power steering stop leak. I have had a few cars benefit from Lucas over the years, it's a cheap band-aid that usually gets results. If it is really shot- try a local parts store. Napa seems to have better quality than say Autozone- in my opinion. And congrats on the ELCO!
Thanks!! its leaking pretty bad, Im thinking of putting new seals in it, but I also might as well just buy a new one while its off.
 

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there are some good rebuilt units and some low quality one's. OPG original parts group used to sell a good remanufactured unit but it cost more then NAPA or other parts store one's.
 

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If you can get one from NAPA then do it
usually Life Time Guarantee of Replacement !
 

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I have a rebuilt unit from Rock Auto that is working fine. If yours works but just leaks, I would fix the leak. These pumps will last almost forever. Most power steering pump leaks are from the reservoir getting bent from prying on it to tighten the belt. The reservoir seals to the pump with a thin o-ring and the rear mounting bolts and pressure fitting also use o-rings between the reservoir and pump. If the can is bent at all, it will leak. You can buy a new reservoir can and o-ring seals. I know Jegs sells them from a couple of different companies. You can always replace the pulley shaft seal also. I always use a pry bar between the front bracket bolts when tightening the belt.
 

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Rebuilds are fine if there done right. Actually they might be a little better since the steel is hardened from use..

I always buy NAPA rebuilt calipers and never had an issue with them..
 

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In the heavy equipment world, a rebuild typically refers to a local or dealer rebuild back to factory specs. A reman (remanufactured) means the part was sent back to the factory, and rebuilt in an assembly line fashion to factory specs, possibly with upgrades. In the first case, your core is re-worked. In the latter, your core is a return, you get a different one back. In the automotive world it's a little foggier. Parts may get cleaned up and what gets replaced is only what failed. Or you may get a fully reconditioned part. Quality will very depending on how much a reman part is truly remanufactured versus repaired. There are some clues, your core value being a good one. Inspect replacement parts, are all wear parts replaced, or the minimum (i.e. on an alternator, are all diode trios new). Is there grit from parts blasting visible, or are parts recoated.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In the heavy equipment world, a rebuild typically refers to a local or dealer rebuild back to factory specs. A reman (remanufactured) means the part was sent back to the factory, and rebuilt in an assembly line fashion to factory specs, possibly with upgrades. In the first case, your core is re-worked. In the latter, your core is a return, you get a different one back. In the automotive world it's a little foggier. Parts may get cleaned up and what gets replaced is only what failed. Or you may get a fully reconditioned part. Quality will very depending on how much a reman part is truly remanufactured versus repaired. There are some clues, your core value being a good one. Inspect replacement parts, are all wear parts replaced, or the minimum (i.e. on an alternator, are all diode trios new). Is there grit from parts blasting visible, or are parts recoated.
Ya that makes sense about the core value being higher, I ended up going with a reman pump from rock auto.Hope it works and fits!
 

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Depends on the rebuilder and components - always.
 
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