Team Chevelle banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
These appear to be the latest and greatest. I believe there is a few small differences. I believe the Aerospace is Graphene Oxide and can be applied anytime. The Turtle Wax is pure Graphene and it is recommended to put a base coat down (so some prep should be done) and then maintenance coats when washing the vehicle (spray and wipe) as opposed to a using a random buffer and pads to apply other products.
Guess there is always something new. Big thing with this for me would be the ease of application and renewal. Just spray and wipe. Supposed to last longer than sealer and much longer than wax.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I have a great paint job with PPG products, 5 coats of Concept 2001 clear. Its been 10 years and never been washed or waxed. The black beauty has won several best paint as well. If a vehicle never gets subjected to adverse conditions there really is no need to apply these products. I mist the car with water and a 100% terry cloth, never a "polyester(plastic)" micro cloth, especially on a dark color, under a black light you can see minute scratches. Having owned a detail shop I am familiar with a lot of these products that are money makers for these companies and the jury is still out on how effective they are. A side note, I applied half of my outside car, a 2018 Cadillac with a ceramic coating and the other half with McGuire's Gold 6 months ago and can not tell the difference. That car gets subjected to the elements.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I guess what youre saying is you havent tried them. Congrats on your show winning paint.
About the only way to not subject a vehicle to adverse conditions is to never take it outdoors. If one never takes a vehicle outdoors what is the sense of having it? Even just pulling it outside and exposing it to the sun will affect the paint on a car. The UV rays are very harmfull to vehicles. Plus certain areas of the country have different pollutants in the air. Id rather drive mine and then c!ean and wax it. I rather enjoy that. Both the driving ane the waxing.
Also these products can beused on all sorts of vehicles, even daily drivers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
As I said, I owned a detail shop and have used many products, I actually had my products made by a company that supplies detail shops. The 35% carnauba I used was great and the cost was $10 bucks a gallon, wax, polish, tire gloss, glaze, degreaser were all from the same supplier as well as the brand names. I also owned a restoration business for 20 years and in my retirement restore 1 at a time. A high dollar show car paint job in a dark color needs different attention than a daily driver. I have a 69 Camaro I painted in 1984 that was a second family car and even lived outside in Texas for a few years, it looks like the day I did it to this day and maybe has had 2 glaze jobs with only 275K miles it still runs great and is maintained properly. The key is keep it clean, hand wash and never a car wash, especially right after that dirty pick-up. Moral of the story a good paint job is different that a daily driver that has just enough paint to last through the warranty and should be cared for with an occasional was job. My muscle cars are kept in a climate controlled environment under cover with a water spray and wipe down after every use.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It’s funny I just reviewed a thread on wax from 2009. There were some names in there that I hadn’t heard for a while such as Zaino, Pinnacle Souverin, NXT. These have all gone by the wayside.
I agree that these companies have to keep recreating products to have the latest hot product.
AFAIK a true wax should be a form of Carnuba. Many years ago I found Collinite Insulator and use that when I want wax. I have found that sealers tend to last a little longer on vehicles that are kept outdoors. So the thing with those is ease of use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Many years ago I found Collinite Insulator and use that when I want wax. I have found that sealers tend to last a little longer on vehicles that are kept outdoors. So the thing with those is ease of use.
I whole heartedly second the Collinite 845. It's my go to. I'm currently testing the durability, on a daily driver, of the Jescar Powerlock topped with Collinite that seems to be popular in a couple of the detailing forums I belong to. My Chevelle wears Collinite.

One tip, I've been using Meguiars D156 spray wax as a drying aid on my daily to help prolong the protection and it really adds gloss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Hope you don't have to re-paint with all those products in the current paint. Once again, if it doesn't get dirty or containments on the paint a spry of water with a terry cloth 100% cotton wipe is fine. That is providing you have a good paint job. Factory paint doesn't count as the water base paint is very thin and deteriorates in a few years. My 69 was painted with Imron in 1984 and looks the same today and never been waxed, glazed a few times only.
 

·
Premium Member
Bill
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
Hope you don't have to re-paint with all those products in the current paint. Once again, if it doesn't get dirty or containments on the paint a spry of water with a terry cloth 100% cotton wipe is fine. That is providing you have a good paint job. Factory paint doesn't count as the water base paint is very thin and deteriorates in a few years. My 69 was painted with Imron in 1984 and looks the same today and never been waxed, glazed a few times only.
So you are saying that if my car has a medium to light coat of dust, it is better to just use a water bottle sprayer and a terry cloth? I always wash it with a garden hose and car wash soap. I thought the soap was suppose to lift the dirt and keep it from scratching while you wipe.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So you are saying that if my car has a medium to light coat of dust, it is better to just use a water bottle sprayer and a terry cloth? I always wash it with a garden hose and car wash soap. I thought the soap was suppose to lift the dirt and keep it from scratching while you wipe.
This is my 2 cents on the matter. If your car only has a light coat of dust then the easiest thing to do is to wipe it down with detailer and a clean microfiber.
You are exactly correct about the car wash soap. It does lift the dirt and that’s a good thing. Some people are afraid to wash their classic cars. I think it is fine and have been washing my 69 with no I’ll effects for 20 years.
Now in all fairness, some older car have gaps in window seals and water can get under moldings,etc. That is why one should use just adequate water to do the job and don’t direct high pressure water to windows, moldings, etc. Just dry it well and take it for a short ride immediately after washing it to blow out any trapped water.
One of the most amusing things I’ve witnessed was a summer rain shower at a car cruise with a parking lot full of trailer queens. I never saw one move so fast to get their cars back in their trailers. I’ll bet if half those guys got caught driving their queen in a rain storm they would have a nervous breakdown. Not that they drive them anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
If your car only has a light coat of dust then the easiest thing to do is to wipe it down with detailer and a clean microfiber.
...
Now in all fairness, some older car have gaps in window seals and water can get under moldings,etc. That is why one should use just adequate water to do the job and don’t direct high pressure water to windows, moldings, etc. Just dry it well and take it for a short ride immediately after washing it to blow out any trapped water.
I'm with Brad on this. I spent quite a lot of time (and a Chevelle's worth of money) learning detailing, paint correction, trying products, etc. For light dusting, bird bombs, and the like, a Detail Spray and good microfiber towel can clean a whole car. The secret is really in the microfiber. While I've never personally seen a Costco microfiber scratch paint, I have some heavy-plush towels for cleaning.

Additionally, I'm hesitant to do a full wash for the reasons Brad listed (seals, moldings) I don't think it hurts every now and again, and I use a bench blower to get the water out of the nooks and crannies.

However, I finally gave in and tried waterless washing and am quite pleased with the results. Basically, think of a detail spray with very high lubricity that will encapsulate dirt and allow it to be very lightly wiped away (towels and technique are everything with this). A clean, dry towel is used to dry and buff. Again proper technique and constantly switch towels while working in sections makes all the difference. My Nissan Juke requires about a dozen 16"x16" towels for a waterless wash.

I have a friend who swears by rinseless washes on his classic, but I've never tried that method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Water on uncoated metal causes rust. Most Detail products are 90% water with petroleum distillates, the price for these products has skyrocketed $12+ for little improvement over water. Put a blue light on your black paint after using a micro rag. Being picky, I know, but when I detail a $180,000k show car for a client, I need to be. My daily drivers not so much.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top