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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And I mean 'real' Winter, not that 50 degree stuff you SoCal guys call Winter.


Just curious if anyone is using their daily drivers all year round where snow is a factor. If so, have you done anything to compensate for the lack of traction? Weights? Studs? (and I mean tire studs, not guys with self image issues)

No, I'm not actually planning to drive my 68 in the Wisconsin snow and salt, but I was wondering if anyone else is brave enough to do this. Studs are outlawed here, so chains or weights are the only options.

Kurt, looking forward to another 20 degree weekend.

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The 68 Chevelle info page. [last updated Nov. 30, 98]
www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Garage/6873/Chevelle/68_Chevelle_Info.html
Email: [email protected]
 

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Sorry man, it was 72 degrees here in NC yesterday!
 

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My 16 yr old daughter drives "our" 66 to school most every day.If it is real nasty out i let her drive the 78 malibu.But to the ? of wieght or studs, no just 215r15 60 TA's for tires and pray.!!!!
 

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My 64 Malibu gets parked for the winter now, but another 64 Malibu Sport Coupe was my all year driver in the 60's.
Get rid of those nice wide tires, some good agressive 7.50x14 snow tires, 100 lbs. of weight in the trunk and a shovel, cover the rad with a piece of cardboard, frost shields on the side and rear window, -40 antifreeze, a good block heater and you are set to go anywhere.

Thats a Canadian prairie set up that still works to-day, although with the improved heating systems the frost shield are not needed.
 

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You betcha,
I drive my '66 every day to work, rain, snow, sleet, whatever; 350 miles per week average. This winter (MD) has been very mild though so snow has not been a problem this year. Also, I was not able to drive it much in January because the stupid aluminum radiator got cracks in it. (They replaced it, but the replacement is doing the exact same thing, so I'm getting a refund and buying a regular radiator). If anything the Chevy is better in the snow than my other car, which is an MR2. That car is rear-engined and has a short wheelbase, and the front wheels start to float and it tries to swap ends, whereas the Chevy will keep going in a straight line if I don't hit the throttle. Posi also helps a little as long as you're very easy on the throttle when turning. It also has all-season radials, which is probably better than performance radials in bad weather. The trick is to stop - you have to give yourself plenty of lead time because the car is so heavy.
If we ever see snow again this winter I can just put the old Powerglide in the trunk to gain traction.
I drove a '66 Malibu in high school also, but that car was not as pretty.
 

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When I had my '72 Elky, I spent 6 months getting her good and did a few shows. Before the next winter it became the ONLY car I had, and I was force to drive it 365. This was a solid car that I got in Az, but within 2 years, the quarters were starting to go and the patch I put in one front fender was going too. Aside from the weather, people took their toll on the car too, parked in an apartment complex lot. Some #[email protected] backed into the front end, damaging the parking light and fender, then left without telling anyone. Somebody decided they HAD to have the chrome valve stem caps (Unbelievable), then somebody else decided the car was too pretty and decided to throw their lit cigarette on the vinyl bed cover and burn a large hole in it. Then there was somebody that thought it would be great fun to stand nails against the tread of all 4 tires so I wouldn't forget to rotate the air in them. (Luckily, I saw that one before I backed out of the space.) Some people just don't like to see someone have something nice. My '67 project will be garaged unless the sun is shining and the roads are dry.

[This message has been edited by DaDon (edited 02-11-99).]

[This message has been edited by DaDon (edited 02-11-99).]
 

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Rear wheel drive cars unfairly get a bad rap when it comes to winter traction. I drove my '69 Elky one winter and it turned out to be one of our worst winters ever. We had over 100" of snow and I never got the thing stuck. I did not put any weight in it (its a myth that El Caminos are light on the back end) although I did have studded tires on it for about half of the winter. I took the studs off so the car would stop wandering all over the road. I think that the problem was mixing 60 series performance tires on the front with mushwall 70 series snow tires. I honestly couldn't tell the difference between the studs and my 245-60 BFG's in snow, but on ice there was at least a slight advantage to the studs. I actually could get through the deep snow better with my Elky than most front wheel drives could. They don't get around real well when the fancy plastic spoiler turns into a snow plow. The open diff. was not excellent on ice but it was managable.

BTW Dave66, I don't know what an MR2 is but it doesn't sound like anything a Chevelle nut should be driving.
 

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I drive my El Camino all the time(why put it up and not enjoy it)Weights? YES 2 bundles of roof shingles. Studs? YES on some good snow tires. If I get stuck (snow or mud) the shingles go under the tires and I'm out in a flash.
 

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Kurt
Frost Shields, used in this part of the country in winter only, on cars up into the 70s. A clear plastic piece that is glued to the inside of the back or side windows to give a thin insulated air space to prevent condensation on the inside during cold weather. Turns a section of the window into a dual-pane window. If condensation forms it in turn freezes. Very hard to see out of windows covered with a thin layer of ice on the inside. On older cars in the 40s and 50s was actually a piece of glass with a rubber
separator, some windshield units even had a wire grid connected to the battery similar to the electric defrost on the rear windows of todays cars..

Took a trip to Florida in the early 50s with my parents in the family 49 Ford. The people down there recognized the "mud" tires but did not know what the power cord hanging out the front was for (block heater) and sure wondered about the "bullet proof glass on the windows" (frost shield all around).

Just some of the joys of driving in the northern part of this continent.

Hope this helps explain along with a little history and humour.
 

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Mr. Byfield, I'll have you know it got down to 34 degrees here last night in So Cal! And it actually snowed in Nor Cal when I was home for winter break!


Other than that, it's been 65 so of course we drive our cars!
--Amanda
 

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I drive my 1965 Malibu in the winter when the roads are dry and clear. This year I drove it on Christmas Eve to pick up my sister and my nephew when her car broke down (can't fit more than 2 in my Sonoma). I also drove it last week since almost all of the snow is gone. I start it a couple of times each week and roll it back and forth when the weather is too bad to drive it; I really don't like the thought of leaving it sit all winter.
 

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Hey guys up here in Coldwater yesterday Feb10 it was 55 Degrees snow is shrinking couldn't drive mine its stored 100 yds from the road 21/2 ft snow in between.Wouldn't drive it if I could with all the crap on the roads.Springs comming soon I hope...FRED
 

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Re: Frost Shields. I live in around the Great Lakes in Canada, and I remember those frost shields well. Frost Shields were simply clear pieces of plastic or vinyl that you stuck to the inside surface of your glass. I guess they prevented condensation on the glass and therefore prevented frost in the deep cold. My mom always drove VW bugs way back when, and the heater and defrosting functions on those cars were laughable. All our bugs had those blasted things. The shields looked geeky, distorted vision, and went cloudy with age. Canadian Tire sold then as late as the early 70's. They are as Canadian as the touque and the winter carnival.
In the past I had driven my '67 Chevelle in snow, but never salt. If I ordered one new for daily service I would take Positraction no matter what. Come to think of it, I'd also take a h.d. alternator and battery, a block heater and a rear window deffogger. If you drive in snow today, by all means get some decent all season tires all around, if not snow tires. Also, if they use road salt where you live DON'T DRIVE YOUR CHEVELLE, unless you are planning on doing a body-off in the spring. Oil spray, however, is a very effective if not messy rustproofing. p.s. maybe you should try to find one of those 'liquid tire chain' dispenser equipped '69 Chevelles. Of the handfull of cars so equipped it is probable that they all rusted out and were scrapped long ago!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the input.

I'm not actually considering taking my 68 in the snow. That's what my Honda is for.

And Amanda, for some reason, I feel no sympathy at all for you and the 34 degrees


We hit a record high of 61 yesterday. It's 22 today and snowing. It's like playing Weather Roulette around here sometimes.

Kurt

------------------
The 68 Chevelle info page. [last updated Nov. 30, 98]
www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Garage/6873/Chevelle/68_Chevelle_Info.html
Email: [email protected]
 

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I live smack dab in lincoln land. Right in the middle of IL. I drive my 68 chevelle whenever I can but I just could not drive it for 2-3 weeks because of a giant 6 foot wall of snow in front of my car. I used to have 205/75r15s on all 4 rims. My chevelle would never bottom out and would just plow through snow (with a bench vise and a bag of sand in the trunk).
 

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Out here in NY, home of the wet winter, I drove my 70 4 door through 2 winters. I put a mean set of studded snows on the back and put my Cragars in the trunk... wasn't too bad but the stoping was a chore. This spring the 2.56 "cripple" rear is being junked for a 4.11 posi so ne winnter should be loads of slip and slide fun.

Francis
 

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Yea, I drove my 70 Malibu one full winter in Winter Park,CO(lots of snow)and it did ok. That summer I put 373 rear end in it,and was forced to drive it on the first snow day of the new winter. It was the worst 20 mi drive I ever had. After hitting a gard rail I made it home, put the car in the garage and did`nt pull it out till spring.
 
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