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I have several times. I like to use a fine piece of piano wire, run it up behind the glass and pull it through then wrap it around a small piece of wood. Its easier if you have a helper, one inside one outside. Pull it all the way around the glass, after you go all the way around press against it with your shoulder, you may have to go around it again if the seal is faily new since it tends to stick back together. I always start at the top. Take your time and go over it a few times.
Ron

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70 Chevelle SS396, 71 Z28-RS, 95 Z28 Convertible. Aces 3081, TC #54 Gold
 

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Do not try and pry the glass out. You will crack it. Any chips you put in the edges can cause cracks at later dates. The previous post suggests the correct method for removing the glass. In essence the wire cuts the sealing material. Good luck.
 

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I took out my rear window easily, It was falling out. I couldn't re-seal it myself successfully at all, total pain. I had insurance so the window accidently broke and a new window was put in for free that seals great. My quarters were filling up with water before this fix, what a pain.

Frank

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If you have it done by someone, I wouldn't use one of the chain repair places that insurance companies usually recomend. I got a nasty scratch on my blazer from an inexperienced repairman.

When it came time to get the rear window in my 69' resealed, I called a local restoration/specialty shop and got a recomendation for a guy that had experience with old cars and could be trusted with my baby.

just a word of caution
 

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Done it twice! (removal) of the rear window. Screwed it up royally the first time.

I've had luck with just using string (yes it rips and you have to re-fish it thru sometimes but no nasty chips on the glass! )The butyl sealant is a real [email protected]*#% to clean up.
I used a product called "Desolv-IT" natural citrus spray cleaner.

When resealing make sure you use the original "sticky-tape" butyl sealer. If you use the ureathane (what most glass shops do and what holds in modern glass) you're asking for trouble.

The original sticky tape has more give to it, maintains the proper "height" so your trim pieces sit on the window right, and makes it possible to remove the window at a later time.

Ureathane liquid sealant is just not made for old car applications. Holds glass to rigid to the body (dangerous if the car gets into an accident) and is way to permanent. If the glass should start to leak again, you can't cut thru this stuff with piano wire!

Good luck. I'm prepping my '70's rear window area with POR-15 so the metal will not rust when water catches in that cursed little 'channel' that runs the base of the window.

Oh yeah, one last thing, the rear window is a good first time removal experience. It is made of tempered glass, it's pretty tough.

The front window is lamenated, breaks very easily compared to the rear one.

I hope this helps.
Joe


[This message has been edited by Coppertop (edited 07-15-99).]

[This message has been edited by Coppertop (edited 07-15-99).]
 

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Coppertop, I don't understand why more rigidity is a bad thing. If it is so bad, why do most automakers urethane the glass in to the new cars? Granted, it is harder to get out if you need to take it out. I have had glass people tell me that alot of the older cars were urethaned in too. I also agree that the butyl tape ensures the correct height for the glass.
There is a tool that holds a blade made to cut out windows, probably like the snap-on tool. I think I paid like $12 for mine from the auto parts/paint store. It has a rigid handle that holds the "L" shaped blade, and a handle/cable assembly to pull the tool through the tape. The hardest part, IMHO, is getting the chrome off without breaking the windshield. There are tools for that too.
 

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Be really careful when you you pull the molding from around the glass - even with the right tool, you can nick the edge of the glass and crack it. I speak from experience.
 

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Dave, On the new cars the glass is a structural part of the body. It needs to be bonded so that there is very little, if any, movement. On our Chevelles it just sits there and keeps us warm and dry. It makes little sense to put it in so that it will be harder to remove it next time. I just did the rear glass on mine and the butyl sealant was easy to use and with a little care not very messy. Philip

PS Zippo lighter fluid works real well for getting the sealer off of things like seats and headliners.

[This message has been edited by 64elcamino (edited 07-16-99).]
 

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Just a PS, if you are going to cut a glass out do it on a warm day, placing the car out in the sunshine makes the job go easier, the butyl is softer and the glass has a little more give. Also some lighter fluid on the Snap-On tool and sealer will make it cut easier. This is from much experience, and broken glass in wrecking yards.
 

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Dave, 64ElCamino summed it up perfectly. You see the ureathane is so rigid that you actually BOND the glass to the body. The 'ol Chevelles don't have a body structure that requires rigid glass.

In fact, I see this as a danger. Al brought up a good point on this topic a while ago. You could actually have a liability issue if the glass wasn't put in with the original sealer.
Worst case scenario as I see it is that your riding along and someone hits your car big time, the quarter panel flex and move the sealer, butyl would squish and flex. Ureathane would take the glass with it. this would result in a shower of glass.

If you've ever seen a modern car after an accident, you'll 9 out 10 times see windshield/back window damage. I saw a late model Honda after it got swiped, huge crack running diagonal from windowshield corner to corner.

This is why you don't won't rigid glass.

I did have and experience with ureathane, I don't know how you'd cut out a chevelle window with it in. Ureathane is tough!

I think you'd need specialty tools, called a sledge hammer and a broom
 

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Gearhead,
I've done both the front and back blass on my '71. Got my "tool" from Eastwood and it really wooks well. The butyl sealant comes with 2 hard rubber blocks for the back glass. USE THEM to hold the glass up at the proper hight. I'll have to redo mine in a few weeks when the new paint goes on. Anyway, just thought I'd mention that. I forgot to use them the first time. Good luck

ACES #2716
 
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