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Wanna replace all of my brake lines when I have the drum to disc conversion done on the front.
1971 Malibu, originally a ten bolt, but has a twelve bolt now. Four wheel drums right now.
TIA, Brian
 

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I would recommend either The Right Stuff, Classic Lines or Lines to Go. I would avoid at all costs In Line Tube because they are liars and thieves. Worst vendor in the industry IMO.
 

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I went with all stainless steel brake lines and regretted it. That is some hard metal and I struggled to get all connections to seal up for no leaks. Some sections had to be redone with a mild steel line.

Rick

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1968 Malibu sport coupe, 489 ci. 590 hp 600 tq, RV T-400 Freakshow 3200 stall, 3.73 12 bolt posi
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I agree ^^^ if I were to do it again I'd use I believe it's called nickel/copper, bends with a hand tubing bender if you need to readjust a prebent bend and doesn't rust
 

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1964 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 4 door
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I got a roll of nicop (nickel/copper) from Napa and ran my own lines. The lines are soft enough to bend and manage by hand, flared easy too. I would 100% do it again vs trying to get a pre-bent system to work in my car.
 

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I;m with Rick and Rick. SS is really hard to seat. Use regular steel and give it a matte clear coat. I use Classic Tube as they are local to me. Excellent folks.

IF you don't mind the green look, the nicops mentioned by Jeff DOES NOT require a bender. I still use a wire wrap for big bends but super easy to form. Also easy to cut double fares into. Again, SS lines are really hard to flare with the cheap flaring kit I have.
 

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I would recommend either The Right Stuff, Classic Lines or Lines to Go. I would avoid at all costs In Line Tube because they are liars and thieves. Worst vendor in the industry IMO.
Why is In Line Tube bad? (I've had good experiences with Right Stuff).

Stainless is difficult. I think it's best to use it only when you are mating the line to another new part (master cylinder, distribution block, etc.) because the old parts will be deformed/cut into by the prior lines, making it difficult to get a good seat. I've found that tightening and loosening several times to form a seal doesn't always work on old parts. If you run into trouble you can use a copper washer. But regular steel is easier and will last plenty long if it's not a daily driver on salted roads.
 

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I’ve used stainless brake and fuel lines on the Chevelle, (2) C3 Vettes, and my 03 Avalanche.
It is only tough to seal if the fittings/tubing are not square. (Mild steel simply bends to make a seal). Use a long socket to bend tubing to a perfect seat area and tighten. Most kits require a little tweaking to seat properly.

I prefer SS since it will last forever and looks great.
 
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Why is In Line Tube bad?
I had an absolute horrible experience with the above.
They are the only business of any kind I have ever turned into the Better Business Bureau. I am not exaggerating with the claim of worst vendor in the industry.
 
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I had an absolute horrible experience with the above.
They are the only business of any kind I have ever turned into the Better Business Bureau. I am not exaggerating with the claim of worst vendor in the industry.
:-( I hope I have a better experience ... I ordered a complete stainless set from Inline for my dad's truck. Going stainless because all the brakes parts are getting replaced and I'm a glutton for punishment.
 

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1970 El Camino SS396, VortecPro 467, ATI TH400, Moser 12 bolt /TruTrac 3:42, Hedman headers
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My stainlesss brake line install in my 70 El Camino SS was an experience, several portions were not up to factory standards. My suggestion would be to install only ONE section per day to avoid damage to parts and self and to avoid the dreaded foul mouth. Seems like they all have to be messaged a bit OR MORE. Will be using NICOPP for my fuel lines....Just remember there are different grades of NICOPP tubing out there...watch your wall thickness, some stuff from "over there" is thin walled, etc.
 

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Ordered a stainless line kit from Inline Tube many many yrs ago., Some pieces were correct others werent
No way youre gonna be bending or tweaking a stainless line. Eventually they exchanged it for regualr line...thye wouldnt just refund me for the stainless. So I took those lines to a guy who specialized in stainelss...made sure the reg lines I got fit and polished them all fterwards. Looks great but I wouldnt do it again.
Everything has to be square as said, lined up perfect etc.

I wont go into the nightmare of fabbing up 1/2" stainless fuel lines. lol
 

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I'm surprised that In Line has such a bad reputation, I was a dealer of their products years ago and sold at least a hundred sets with no complaints.

I still use their stuff on old and newer cars alike. I usually stick with the OEM steel. I did have one line for a 2003 Alero have the wrong fitting size, but it may have been a situation that GM used different sizes for different years.
 

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With all the horror stories about stainless, and the difficulty in bending it, I wonder why people still use it.

I love NiCopp, especially for brake lines. It's sooooo easy to bend by hand. It's also really good for fuel line (e85 safe!) and trans cooler lines. I did some 1/2" NiCopp fuel lines on my drag car. That was a bit tougher to bend.

I know some of you guys love factory looking stuff, but if you dont need that, NiCopp is the way to go. It'll last every bit as a long as Stainless in this application.

Get a flaring tool like this one, super easy to use, especially on the car. https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/SER161A

-Dave
 
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I;m with Rick and Rick. SS is really hard to seat. Use regular steel and give it a matte clear coat. I use Classic Tube as they are local to me. Excellent folks.

IF you don't mind the green look, the nicops mentioned by Jeff DOES NOT require a bender. I still use a wire wrap for big bends but super easy to form. Also easy to cut double fares into. Again, SS lines are really hard to flare with the cheap flaring kit I have.
Are you saying that the nickel/copper turns green like pure copper does? I've never heard that before.
 

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I agree with the others about bending and flaring your own.
 

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1968 Malibu sport coupe, 489 ci. 590 hp 600 tq, RV T-400 Freakshow 3200 stall, 3.73 12 bolt posi
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I've used pieces from the local parts stores to repair parts of lines and never seen anything turn Green
 

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1964 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 4 door
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I've been caught in the rain a few times and not a spec of green on mine.
Same here? I literally drove my car through hurricane michael, floorboards were filling with water, been through the mountains of Georgia unfortunately with salt still on the road, mine still looks great..
 
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