Team Chevelle banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part May's Ride of the Month Challenge!

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone explain to me how this stuff works? I think I have som eidea about anti-squat, I think appropriate ladder bar suspension will counter the squat tendancy (please, please correct me if I'm wrong, because this is merely conjecture). But how would anti-dife supension work? I can't figure it out for the life of me.

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
anti-dive? if your refering to drag race shocks 90/10's what they do is release easy and are extra firm coming back down if used with say 70/30 rear shocks in which compress easy and slowly retract,,(weight transfer)you want to shift the weight to the rear of the car and hold it till you launch,,TRACTION.......i hope this helps you out some
Rick....
oh and the ladder bars will help lift the car which will help the back end squat a bit,air bags in the springs will help that preferably one in the right side but 2 wont hurt less air in the left than the right
once again hope this helps,,and this is just my opinion......
Rick....
------------------





[This message has been edited by 4MyChevelles (edited 01-17-2002).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That helps a bit- I wondered what people meant by 90-10s etc. thanks! that isn't quite what I meant though.

I guess I should have been more specific - I don't want to drag race the car, it's a street car, but I'm curious - my buddy's mustang seems to 'sit up' when you get on the gas - you hit it hard and the back end almost seems to lift up a bit - this is what I mean by anti squat. Also, some sports cars, when you hit the brakes, the front end doesn't dive, the car stays level... I just want to know how this works as it increases your braking ability, and your braking through corners ability, as well as your acceleration through corners ability.

I understand the physics of weight transfer, etc, but I'm more concerned with handling for this car than hooking up.

Thanks again

Cam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,230 Posts
Sorry in advance for being so wordy but this is a technical subject.....
Anti-squat and anti-dive are geometries built into the suspension to do exactly what they imply. You've pretty well got the method on anti-squat. Things like ladder bars, Southside bars, or adjustable upper trailing arms as well as pinion angles with cause what is called the "instant center" to move. If I understand the concept myself(I'm still learning so don't take this all as gospel) you want the IC to move down and back as much as possible. I should back up and define instant center as the intersection point of the upper and lower control arms. Most cars have this some where towards the front and sometimes beyond the nose of the car. I'm a lttle fuzzy as to EXACTLY why this is bad but it is. The basic upshoot of this is, your friends car is set up correctly according to Newtons law of opposing forces. If the back end rises, then it is driving the tires into the pavement with the same force. On the other hand, if a car squats, it is pulling up on the tires with an equal force. The front is esentially the same. If the front dives too much, you start to overload the front tires and brakes and unload the rear tires and brakes. If you want a car to handle, all four tires need to work equally to get the most out of the suspension. When it comes down to it, you've only got a couple of square feet of rubber trying to hold onto several thousand pounds of steel while you pitch it into a corner at 60 mph. I have read and re-read a book called "Circle Track Suspension" by Forbes Aird. It's pretty technical and focuses on left hand turns but the principles are the same for right handers as well.Hope this was some what helpful......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
80Classic,
Check out this month's issue of Car Craft. Team Chevelle's own writer for Car Craft, Tony Nausieda (aka "70L34"), wrote an excellent article to help explain the concepts and theories to those wanting to learn more about suspension theory.

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks a lot, I'll take a look at that reference material. Appreciate everyone's help!

Cam
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top