Team Chevelle banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm building my garage and I want to know which Craftsman compressor you suggest and why. I will never paint the Chevelle but I will be doing grinding, fabricating etc w/ air tools. I don't want any regrets by going to small but I am realistic enough to know I'm not gonna be grinding and painting all day long. Any advice would be apprec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Grinding and painting don't require much air, maybe only around 5 CFM. The big question is, are you going to be doing any major sandblasting, glass beading, etc? Glass beading and siphon blasting should be OK with 5-10 CFM of air, put pressure blasting uses a lot. If you don't plan on doing any pressure blasting, a Sears 5 or 6 hp compressor should be fine. My dad and I run two in tandem for pressure blasting, we have to 5 HP units with 25 gal tanks. They work quite well.

------------------
Ian McDermott
1970 Chevelle SS 396
Gold Member #101
E-mail: [email protected]
Web page: chevelle.dhs.org
ICQ UIN: 3923441
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I have a 60 gal 6hp single stage compressor I got from Sam's about 5 years ago and have never been disappointed. I sandblasted my chassis and can run impact wrenches etc. with no problem.

------------------
67 Malibu 454/TH350
Team Chevelle Gold Member #97
Charleston, SC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I agree with HAVOC. Unless you do pressure type sandblasting, 9 cfm is usually plenty. Die grinders, DA sanders also use quite a bit of air but one compressor will keep up. As a note for those who want a real big compressor for blasting, you can buy 2 single stage compressors for cheaper that a two stage compressor and you will get more air volume.
Tom

------------------
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
I recently bought the Craftsman 6.5HP 30 gallon model. It has the same specs as their big upright it just has a smaller tank, it's a lot cheaper, and it's easier to move if needed. I haven't used it for anything big (sanding, blasting, etc...) but I figured it was the best one to get for the money.

------------------
Rick Sutter
Member #383
'67 SS 396
San Antonio, TX
www.sutternet.com/chevelle.asp
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,438 Posts
get the 60gal 6hp model, you can never have enough air. Some small tools use a lot of air, like a cutoff wheel or grinders, and because they are on full speed for long amounts of time a small compressor wont be able to keep up. Buy one with the most CFM you can afford.

------------------
70 chevelle ss396 conv
66 chevelle ss396 hdp/conv
55 chevy prostreet
 

·
Gold Founding Member
Joined
·
10,968 Posts
I started with a De Vilbiss 4-hp, 20 gallon tank. Five seconds of die grinder or air hammer, five minutes to regain pressure. Do you have any idea how long it takes to chisel out ball joint rivets that way? Maybe eight seconds of impact gun, but you can hear it losing speed towards the end.

I now have a Sandborn 6.5 hp, 60 gallon tank. It will not keep up with a rubber-tip blow gun, until the pressure drops to about 50 psi. Better with die grinder, very acceptable with an impact gun. You wouldn't want to even consider using it with a sandblaster.

If you're gonna actually USE an automotive air tool, don't waste time and money with less than 6 hp-60 gallon tank. Go for an 80 gallon tank if you can, and if you're bucks up enough to assure proper electrical wiring, head straight for the two-stage, 175psi units. You can regulate down, but it is impossible to regulate UP. Set your regulator so that with 175 in the tank, you have 90 psi AT THE INLET OF YOUR AIR TOOL, WHILE IT IS RUNNING! You will NOT get rated power of your impact gun or air ratchet otherwise. This is why most air tools seem gutless- not enough pressure. (you will have to temporarily locate the pressure gauge to the tool inlet port.) With a typical single stage compressor, don't bother to install a regulator, you need all the air you can get. 120 psi in the tank gives you about 80 at the inlet of your tool, while operating. (depending on the tool and air hose, of course. )Sure, you may have 120 at the tool before you pull the trigger.


Personal opinion: Stay away from Sears or any other "oil free" compressor, unless you plan to spraypaint. Durability is found in an ALUMINUM compressor that has iron sleeves, and a supply of dead, processed dinosaur in the sump. Change the dinosaur now and again, and it'll work fine forever.



[This message has been edited by Schurkey (edited 11-16-99).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
One thing that hasn't been mentioned is voltage. If you want a serious compressor, none of the 110V units cut it. Their HP is over-rated and bogus. Most real continuous HP you can get from 110V, 15A is 2.2HP. 220V, 20A units comes in at 5.9HP but you'll need to wire a 220V outlet.
RickS' post describes a Sears 220V horizontal unit that I like.


------------------
Fred Aldrich
Web Site: www.GeoCities.com/~69_chevelle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,980 Posts
All those who advocate 6hp/60 gal/220vt are on the money. Even if you don't need that much now, the day may come. I have an older 5hp/60 gal which I paid about what the discount tool places now sell 6hp/60 gal for. If you don't have a blaster now, you may someday and it will be necessary. Also, the bigger unit keeps up better and works less and uses less energy. Add 2 or 10 water seperators to your lines also (can't have too many). This truly is one place where bigger is better.

------------------
Tom Parsons
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,078 Posts
Dude!
Look in Harbor Freight tools catalog. There is a new item page 30 of the new flier that came this week. A Ingersoll-Rand 6.5 Hp 60 gal. Has 10.3 CFM @ 135 PSI that about 11.5 @ 90 PSI! The Item number in the catalog is 41764-OHHA call them 1-800-423-2567. No taxes and free shipping. The catalog list it for $499.99

------------------
Thanks In Advance!
John Corbin
67' Chevelle Malibu Sleeper(Someday):)
San Antonio, Texas
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top