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I paid a guy to sandblast a bunch of parts for me, (about 20). He charged me $5 for small parts, and $10 for large parts. After they are sandblasted, what should I do to prepare for paint? Soap and water makes them rust. The sandblast dust is all over them so I can'T just primer them. What is the right way? THANK YOU.
 

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I usually wipe them down with a damp rag until the rag is clean, then prime and paint
 

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wash them in water first..let them dry then use a grease remover then prime....im thinking that if the parts are warm they will dry faster ..don't let them sit for a few days.that's when rust will start..i'm sure others will chime in to let you know of their secrets
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you also. So if I wash with water and dry quickly, rust will not be under the primer?
 

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I sandblast my own parts and will normally group them by what color I'm going to paint them. I blast just enough parts so I can paint them the same day. I blow any loose sandblasting remains off the parts and wipe them off about 3 times with white paper towels that are wet with a PPG cleaner, degreaser. I tape off any areas that have to be taped off. Wipe the parts off with degreaser one more time let them air dry then suspend the parts by wire from the ceiling beams in the basement. I blow the parts off lightly just to remove any lint left from the paper towels. I don't even prime stuff just use a good rattle can paint to paint the parts. The sandblasted surface seems to create a good surface for the paint to adhere to. Been doing it like this for years with no problems of lifting or peeling.
 

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I sandblast my own parts and will normally group them by what color I'm going to paint them. I blast just enough parts so I can paint them the same day. I blow any loose sandblasting remains off the parts and wipe them off about 3 times with white paper towels that are wet with a PPG cleaner, degreaser. I tape off any areas that have to be taped off. Wipe the parts off with degreaser one more time let them air dry then suspend the parts by wire from the ceiling beams in the basement. I blow the parts off lightly just to remove any lint left from the paper towels. I don't even prime stuff just use a good rattle can paint to paint the parts. The sandblasted surface seems to create a good surface for the paint to adhere to. Been doing it like this for years with no problems of lifting or peeling.
This..^^
 

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Wipe down with lacquer thinner then blow dry, tac rag them then epoxy.
 

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I sandblast my own parts and will normally group them by what color I'm going to paint them. I blast just enough parts so I can paint them the same day. I blow any loose sandblasting remains off the parts and wipe them off about 3 times with white paper towels that are wet with a PPG cleaner, degreaser. I tape off any areas that have to be taped off. Wipe the parts off with degreaser one more time let them air dry then suspend the parts by wire from the ceiling beams in the basement. I blow the parts off lightly just to remove any lint left from the paper towels. I don't even prime stuff just use a good rattle can paint to paint the parts. The sandblasted surface seems to create a good surface for the paint to adhere to. Been doing it like this for years with no problems of lifting or peeling.
I would follow this also. ^^^^^^^^
You could dry them in the oven if you use water. I think there is a primer/paint combo spraypaint out there
 

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I use the same procedure as Hank except that only the cast parts get painted directly. Any smooth metal parts get an etch primer first. Either way works just a personal preference.
 

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Metal prep. I've used lacquer thinner in the past. Currently, using acetone to wipe down parts. In any event, cover them quickly. Even if it means a light dusting of spray can primer (spray etching primer).
 

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I wipe down twice with wax and grease remover. Then small parts get self etching primer then paint. But large parts get epoxy black or epoxy prime then color.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
TO GMSPORT: Just curious why etching primer on small and epoxy on large parts? Thanks
 

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Blasted parts are ready for primer and paint, just blow off the dust. No need for wax and grease remover unless your blaster is supplied by a POS air system. Decades in this business and never had an issue.

Water to clean blasted parts? Never heard of a shop doing that.

If you are compelled to wipe them down, get lint free rags. Paper towels suck. Media grit sizes leave different profiles, some will tear your rags up and leave a lot of lint.
 

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I second what Scott is saying and I'll add, wiping the blasted parts with W&G remover will leave residue behind, not what you want. No possible way to wipe a porous substrate and remove the stuff left in the pores, be it lint, or solvent residue.
I just clean with compressed air and a brush and prime.
 

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I second what Scott is saying and I'll add, wiping the blasted parts with W&G remover will leave residue behind, not what you want. No possible way to wipe a porous substrate and remove the stuff left in the pores, be it lint, or solvent residue.
I just clean with compressed air and a brush and prime.
You can use W&G but it takes a long time to evaporate due to the porous nature as you state. Not much of an issue with very fine media.
 

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It's best to use wax and grease remover as opposed to any type of thinner if you have to, I generally try to keep the parts dry at all times.

Wear gloves, blow them off with air compressor, hopefully a compressor that does not spit a lot of water/oil.

If any of my sandblasted parts ever flash rust, I blast them again.
 

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Blasted parts are ready for primer and paint, just blow off the dust. No need for wax and grease remover unless your blaster is supplied by a POS air system. Decades in this business and never had an issue.

Water to clean blasted parts? Never heard of a shop doing that.

If you are compelled to wipe them down, get lint free rags. Paper towels suck. Media grit sizes leave different profiles, some will tear your rags up and leave a lot of lint.
:yes::yes::yes: Jan 10th marked my 30th year of doing sandblasting/painting & restoration. I started my business when I was a sophomore in high school and have doing exactly what Scott is saying and have never had any issues. Just blow them off and start priming.
 

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I do exactly as Scott says, have been for 30 years.
no paper, no liquids.



ETD 66SS, wax and grease remover is not the same as lacquer thinner. The idea in cleaning is to wet the surface enough to float the contaminates up into the liquid. The liquid is then wiped off with multiple rags. Thinner dries to quickly for this and does not wipe as clean, leaving a residue.
 

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I know that Scott and others on here know what they are talking about, more than me, but I also know I've never had any issues with adhesion using thinner followed by a tach rag. Sometimes I just blow it off....point is Sometimes People make this stuff too hard. Lots of ways/ opinions and many will work.
 
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