Team Chevelle banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My father has just purchased his first larger air compressor, a 60gal vertical tank with a 230V 2 cyl compressor on top. The manual was completely useless, no instructions, just some warnings. This is a low use/weekend hobby compressor. Dad will be working his old car (’59 Fairlane 500 hardtop) getting it ready for paint. It is very similar to (possibly just a re-brand of this one): http://www.cpocampbellhausfeld.com/air_compressors/professional_air_compressors/vh6111.html

Some install questions:

1. What the heck is ‘running horse power’? The sales guy tried to tell him it was “like a 5hp” but it says I think it was 2.9HP on it?

2. The sales guy told my father to get a hockey puck under each of the three mounting feet for vibration/noise before lagging it to the concrete floor. This seems a little sketchy, but I get the idea. What is the preferred method for mounting to the floor?

3. Are automatic tank drains worth while? If so, should the drain be plumbed out through the wall?

4. Is a combo regulator water trap ok or are they to be avoided in favour of separate units?

5. He does not plan to paint, but does plan to sand, maybe sandblast, as well as impact etc. Is there a minimum length of hard line recommended before a rubber line is used? If so, we’d likely use 1/2" copper, soldered joints.

7. What oil is recommended for the compressor? I know you can buy ‘compressor oil’ – but what grade is that? Although his shop is heated, he will let the temp drop to ~35F during periods of non use during the winter.

8. Is there a break-in procedure?

9. Should he use a lubricator to keep the air tools lubed? I worry about oil exhaust from a sander getting on the car…..

TIA!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Some install questions:

1. What the heck is ‘running horse power’? The sales guy tried to tell him it was “like a 5hp” but it says I think it was 2.9HP on it?

It is the HP/TQ rating under running load. Start up HP/TQ is higher to handle the voltage spike need to get it rotating. A 5 hp motor in usually larger in diameter and both will be displayed on the motor data sticker. Depanding on how the feild windings are wired (wYe or Delta wound) will change your HP and voltage rating. The manual should reflect these ratings.

2. The sales guy told my father to get a hockey puck under each of the three mounting feet for vibration/noise before lagging it to the concrete floor. This seems a little sketchy, but I get the idea. What is the preferred method for mounting to the floor?

Isolators, rubber mounts, shocks or "hockey pucks" will do just that, reduce vibration which in return will prolong the life of your compressor legs. Plus it will help the feet from rusting if your drain is directly under the compressor receiver.

3. Are automatic tank drains worth while? If so, should the drain be plumbed out through the wall?

You can and probably would be a good idea... Large compressors produce a lot of water and if you forget to open the drain valve after use that water will not only cause rust inside the receiver but can make its way to your air tools...

4. Is a combo regulator water trap ok or are they to be avoided in favour of separate units?

Combo units work ok but you can expect some moisture in your lines. Use an individual moisture separator with an automatic drain. And design low purge lines by your coupling connection points in your shop hard lines with a drain valve...

5. He does not plan to paint, but does plan to sand, maybe sandblast, as well as impact etc. Is there a minimum length of hard line recommended before a rubber line is used? If so, we’d likely use 1/2" copper, soldered joints.

Copper can rust inside and get in your air tools. PVC pipe is cheaper and depending on the wall thickness, the cheap stuff can handle up to 175 psi... Look at the ratings stamped on the PVC. You can set it up several couplings along the pipe, then use your rubber from the tie-in.

7. What oil is recommended for the compressor? I know you can buy ‘compressor oil’ – but what grade is that? Although his shop is heated, he will let the temp drop to ~35F during periods of non use during the winter.

Yes you can buy compressor oil and it has different ratings. The owner's manual "should" give the viscosity rating.

8. Is there a break-in procedure?

No... You did not buy a commercial unit and unless it says to in the Owner's Manual there is not a break in or run in period... They are plug-in and play... However with any new compressor you may want to change the oil after about the first 10 operating hours. Then once a year after that depending on use.

9. Should he use a lubricator to keep the air tools lubed? I worry about oil exhaust from a sander getting on the car…..

Yes and you should. 2 or 3 drops of oil is all that is needed for motion type air tools. If you have large amounts of oil coming out of the tool then you used to much. If the oil get on your work you will have to remove it with a degreaser solvent...

TIA!!


Well I hope this helps and I'm sure other will have some helpful hints too...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
If you set up your airline for sandblasting (moisture removal) you will never have to worry about painting or getting water into your air tools, because water brings contaminats with it, that will decrease the life of your air tools.

Try and run a minimum of 50 feet of hard line, if you can go longer then that, do it. All your doing with the long runs of hard pipe is cooling the hot air out of your compressor, once it cools you have water, if you set it up to get rid of the water right, then you have dry air.

The drawing here shows you how to do it without an expensive air dryer.

http://www.1969supersport.com/draw1.html

Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,218 Posts
I used this diagram as a guideline to install a system at work last week. We're running two compressors and a third 80 gallon receiver. Piped it all in with 120' of 1 1/4" galvanized, with 3/4" drops to the three stations. We can get to using a lot of air sometimes. ;)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,560 Posts
go to your Ingersol dealer and buy the rubber pads for the feet.

and you dont have to bolt it to the floor if you have it on rubber pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Do NOT use PVC, it will get old & explode like a hand grenade. It is outlawed by OSHA. use the copper & then hose.
Maybe it is not "PVC" but it is a hard black plastic line that is rated at 225 psi and I've used it on my setup for over 10 years... Humm maybe I have a hand grenade and didn't even know it??? :eek:

Ok rust may have not been the word of choice but it does deteriorate over time...
The "greenish" color left on weathered copper is called "patina" and is a
complex mixture of copper oxides and carbonates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for all the great replies gents, lot of good advice there.

JR - never been to Whitchita, though have been to Manhatten, nice area - maybe next time I am in KS....As to copper, our car club shop was fully plumbed in 1/2" copper with soldered joints in 1971 without incident to date, so I think I am fine there. I can't imagine the copper oxidizing worse than black iron pipe would rust in any case. But I do agree that copper will oxidize over time. As to the plastic pipe - were you referring to ABS maybe?

Darren et al who posted piping routing - thanks for the tip. I must admit that this seems a lot closer to a professional installation than something a weekend warrior would need. If the issue is water, why would I not, for a simple home use install, put a water trap right at teh compressor and another one at the wall outlet for the tool? Certainly we would consider the full plumbing but cost for the accessories and piping/fittings will be as much or more than the compressor!?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,341 Posts
I set mine or rubber pads, nothing special just the inexpensive rubber cabinet pads you get at the Home Depot.

Tank drain - put an elbow into bottum of tank and run a short line out with a ball valve on the end, allows you to blow down the tank real quick.

I run a Full port ball valve off the compressor outlet to a flex line, then into hard line. Run the hard line a good 30' up near the ceiling of the garage, then drop down for you regulator/ water separator. Drop the line down to about 42" off the floor, then make a T- connection with the run pointing to the floor and the branch of the tee used for the Filter/Regulator. The straight run gets a length of pipe about 18" long then a ball valve to be used as a blow down. Theory is simple. Air cools in the main pipe run and condensation forms. By design the drop leg acts like a water trap and reduces the amount of water the Filter/Regulator has to manage. Blow the trap leg down on a regular basis as you would the tank.

I used 3/4" galvanized pipe and fittings for my install. 10 years and still going strong.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top