Team Chevelle banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My '71 Malibu was bought with an "ok" paint job. A little orange-peel and ok looking. But it's had key scratches down one side since before I bought it. There's a hole clear through the hood from a lame A/C place, and small chips and cracks all over. From one hot summer (this is a daily driver in CA) the trunk is starting to peel up and crack a little.

So - I it needs paint, but it's in no condition to "shoot over" what's there: I couldn't take it to OneDay or Maaco and spray over this. I suspect there's some rear window rust in the typical area. Should it be stripped all the way to metal? I'm not doing a serious restore, just want to make the exterior nicer. Doorjams, engine bay and trunk can stay as they are; I won't change the color (Mulsanne Blue).

I can see someone shot over the original green (and primer) with this blue coat. So 3 coats to strip off...

So... most likely this would take a DA sand/grind to the visible surfaces? Then fix the rust, etc. and prime and shoot? It's not worth spending a ton of money on (I've already spent far more than it's worth in just getting it running and handling well.) But it's my car, and want it to look good from the outside, which it barely does now.

I'm thinking this is $2-3000 of work, depending on what we find? I don't want a mirror-finish show car, I just want all the panels clean and smooth and matching. Not a lot to ask...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
If the trunk is peeling the rest of the car will be peeling soon.
It sounds like the original lacquer is still on the car, that is not a good foundation. The repaint also does not sound like it is very helathy.
From the info you gave, I would recommend stripping it to bare metal and starting again.
You can use a DA or chemical stripper and a DA to get the paint off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I agree with Greg. Usually you want to strip a car after it has two paint jobs anyways. If you are thinking about using bc/cc, lacquer is definately not a good base to spay over. I personally like to chemical strip because its faster, but it makes a mess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input: I've been thinking about doing the DA strip myself. I don't think it would be that hard to take down carefully, with some advice and testing on old parts first. Howard's Backyard AutoBody DVD is on its way here. Will do plenty of searches here, too. I can remove my own trim before the strip, but may have someone more experienced do the harder bits (drip rails, etc. which I've found troublesome).

Then have someone look at any bodywork that may need doing.

(Yes, it's old lacquer underneath = that's why the trunk is peeling up I think. It will certainly need to be taken down.) As I'm not changing color, I think it won't be a terrible job to shoot the visible surfaces once primered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
If you're gonna try to DA it...you better have a bad ass air compressor. I bought a DA and it laughed at my compressor. I ended up Chemical stripping. I found it best to get a good wire brush bit for my drill and run it over all the paint then put the stripper on. This helped the stripper penetrate ALOT better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,856 Posts
A big air compressor and a ton of paper - Use the chemical stripper and then follow up with the DA.

LK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ah - so many ideas. Will consider all this before starting... I'm a few weeks away at least. Will also search the forum and compile all people have said, there's tons of info on this in various forms. Now that I know WHAT to do, it's a question of stripping paint, period...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I use an old hole punch can opener on my drip rail moldings. Ones like people use to punch holes in juice cans. With the can opener you can do the drip rail yourself, just be easy and take your time.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top