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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've been doing a lot of work, but not much that is readily visible. More rigging, plumbing, adjusting flight controls and adjusting flaps.
For the past 3wks I've been building a jump seat to be installed behind the pilot's seat. This will permit 4 people to be on the flight deck when we're flying (pilot, co-pilot, and two in jump seats).

This is the frame to the jump seat I fabricated 3wks ago.



I finished everything on the jump seat today (including paint).



We had to do some "rearranging" of equipment behind the pilot's seat to make room for the new jump seat.
This is the area where it will be installed. Four bolts will attach it to the flight deck floor structure. The seat belt will be attached to the seat frame. Thus, when it's time to remove the seat to gain access the the cables below for inspections, we will simply remove 4 bolts and pull the entire seat assembly and belts out together. As we speak, we have a guy making seat cushions for the seat.
 
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I guess if you operating this bird under Experimental category you can do this kind on modification. Not so in a certified airplane.
I assume the frame is made out of aluminum and bolted together. After 4 to 6 hours in that beast my tush would be dragging. It may work as needed but not real comfortable.
I flew twin engine rigs in Vietnam but I have no time an A26's. They look like they would be a hand full on one engine.
Al
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are those control cables in the bottom of the second picture??
Yes they are, mostly flight control cables and some engine control cables.
Notice that raised panel coming out from under the back of the pilot's seat. The main rudder cables are under under that panel. To gain access to those cables for annual inspection after the plane is finished and the jump seat is installed, ALLLLL the seats will have to be removed, the floor panels removed and the panel behind the jump seat removed so that a thorough inspection can be accomplished.
Consequently we've given a lot of detailed attention to how everything is put together so that when we have to take it apart for inspections, maintenance or repairs, it will be as painless as possible. ALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL the fasteners/hardware (nuts, bolts, screws, washers, etc) are new and very lightly coated to prevent any corrosion and make it easier to remove them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess if you operating this bird under Experimental category you can do this kind on modification. Not so in a certified airplane.
I assume the frame is made out of aluminum and bolted together. After 4 to 6 hours in that beast my tush would be dragging. It may work as needed but not real comfortable.
I flew twin engine rigs in Vietnam but I have no time an A26's. They look like they would be a hand full on one engine.
Al
These planes were built during WWII to perform a military mission, NOT for commercial passenger comfort purposes. The jump seat for the gunner (so that he could come forward after leaving the target and sit up front with the crew on the return to base) is even much more spartan.
WE HAVE ADDED THE JUMP SEAT BEHIND THE PILOT FOR PASSENGERS TO SIT UP FRONT WITH THE CREW IF THEY WISH, AND IF THEY ARE WILLING TO PAY MORE FOR A "FRONT SEAT" RIDE IN AN OLD WARBIRD. NOT TO MAKE THEM COMFORTABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is the ORIGINAL Douglas built WWII jump seat for the gunner. It is readily apparent how much (or how little) comfort he had. Thus, I believe the additional jump seat which we are adding will be somewhat more comfortable--------------ESPECIALLY since it will have cushions!



Installed, behind the co-pilot seat, in the raised and secured position above the crawl-way which goes back into the bombay area.



Lowered position.



When the gunner came forward, and lowered the jump seat, this is the where he would be in relation to the co-pilot. Extreme comfort------------------------NOT!




 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It might, but Douglas didn't make one for the left side, PLUS, there was originally some equipment behind the pilot's seat, PLUS, there ain't none available. Just by a pure chance of luck we found the gunner's jump seat in an old A26 that had been on static display since 1957 ( the plane was a piece of corroded junk!!!)
 

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Wow, I couldn't sit in that jump seat for more than a few minutes before the ol' knees would start screaming. Maybe when I was 18, like most of those gunners were.....

BTW, it looks more like an old Harley solo seat....:)
 

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I'd put up with my knees screaming for a while for a ride in something like that! (and mine would scream too!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
As I mentioned, creature comfort is not the concern, the 2 additional seats are for those people who want a "front seat" ride in a WWII bomber!
Sitting on the flight deck of an A26 when making a 350knot low pass down the runway at an airshow is a major rush. I've done a few in the Black A26 that I used to be a part time crew member, and it's still a thrill!

This is what I'm talking about--------------------up front is the place to be---------------------trust me, you don't notice how uncomfortable you are!
 

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---------------------trust me, you don't notice how uncomfortable you are!
I'm sure you don't! One of these days I'm going to pony up the money and take a ride in a WWII plane. I'm sure the flight crews noticed the lack of creature comforts on long flights, but then again, that generation wasn't as used to creature comforts as we are, now.
 

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Another thing that we do not take into account is how small the average person was durning WWII. I have my uncle's dress green Marine Corps uniform, and it is a 36 regular. Lots of vintage stuff I see on ebay is in sizes 34 to 38. I guess just coming out of the depression, that people were not as well fed as we are today. So just because your cornfed ass won't fit too well, don't think that a 135 pound 20 year old had the same problem! And before you accuse me of "fat shaming", I'm 6'2" and 250# and wear a size 50 long suit!
 

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Another thing that we do not take into account is how small the average person was durning WWII. I have my uncle's dress green Marine Corps uniform, and it is a 36 regular. Lots of vintage stuff I see on ebay is in sizes 34 to 38. I guess just coming out of the depression, that people were not as well fed as we are today. So just because your cornfed ass won't fit too well, don't think that a 135 pound 20 year old had the same problem! And before you accuse me of "fat shaming", I'm 6'2" and 250# and wear a size 50 long suit!


My, my how times have changed. I don't even own a suit! Jeans are my uniform of the day.
 
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