Team Chevelle banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Topic: Installation of Quick Performance 9" in 1969 Chevelle

Hi everyone. I just installed my Ford 9” last weekend. I have pictures but haven’t decided exactly how to post them since they are jpeg right now. Maybe I could send them to a moderator or someone, and he could post them. This is pretty long so if there’s somewhere else it should be posted, let me know.

When I originally starting considering this option and getting feedback, quite a few people expressed interest in hearing about the installation. So here it is.

First, it is a Quick Performance 9” in a 69. The workmanship on the housing was excellent. My uncle, who is a machinist and welder and incredibly picky, was VERY impressed with the workmanship. The rear end does not come painted, and I had mine powder coated for $50.

Overall, we spent 21 hours working on it so far. We still need to set pinion angle, bleed the brakes, and readjust the parking brake. I am not a pro mechanic but know the basics. My uncle is building a 34 chevy from the frame up and can fabricate anything. He also drag raced in the 60s and was the head mechanic for a circle track race team, late models mainly, for about 30 years. He was trained as a machinist in the Army and college, and he owned his own industrial parts and welding supplies business for fifteen years, among other things. Moral of the story: I couldn’t have done this without him.

Prep work:

Brakes:

The first issue is the backing plates and brakes. I used my original drums. We had to bore out the backing plates so that the large bearing would fit through it. We also drilled out the drums for the 1/2” studs. 17/32 is the perfect size for those. In retrospect, I would have gotten the brake kit. My uncle has a vertical mill, so we just threw them on there. A guy could also run the backing plates to a machine shop. The axles come with good fasteners, but you have to grind them flat on one side so that they fit, since Ford used t-bolts. No big deal. Also, 3” wheel studs are too long. I am cutting mine down to 2.5”. I am running Pro Stars. On one stud it stripped out a lug nut, and chewed up the end of the stud a little. I don’t know if maybe the stud wasn’t totally straight, since a regular nut went right on with no problem.

I also used the old brake hose line where it is attached to the frame and then goes to the housing. Got rid of the original T and bracket, and just put a new T on. Then new hard line from the drums to the T.

Housing:

The next thing is the bushings on the housing eyes. We made a puller to put those in. Quick usually sends the housing with rubber bushings installed. We did figure out a way to slide it into a press, but it would have been very difficult, and so made a bushing installer. We took the bushings out of the sleeves to put them in, too.

Another issue on the housing is the spring perches. There was a lot of slop there, and so we made spacers out of aluminum for a better fit. The bottom of a spring is not perfectly round of course, but a guy definately needs to make something there.

Might be a good idea to tap a drain plug in the bottom of the housing too. I didn’t do this, but a friend of mine did on his brother’s 9” and he said it worked great.

Installation stuff:

Getting the 12 bolt out was easy. Remove your exhaust completely, if possible. Mine is cut off in front of the axle so we left it on, but then removed it later.

Center Section:

Make sure you have the studs in the housing really straight. It is a challenge getting the center section in. We stuck it on and then looked at how the studs were lined up and then tapped a few of them with a hammer. However, we still had to use a drift punch and whack it pretty good to get it on. I don’t look forward to taking it out, if I ever have to. Also, make sure you put the nut on the bottom two studs while you are putting the center section on, as soon as the studs come through. Otherwise, you have to grind part of the nut to get it by the webbing and onto the stud. Don’t ask how I know this.


Control arms and alignment, fitment:

I have EDL adjustable uppers and Jegs adj lowers. For the lowers, the spacers that came with the JEGS have to be cut to fit. At the moment, my uppers are at the stock length and my lowers are at the stock length, too, though they are in the second hole down on the lower bracket, like they would be with lift bars. With the arms this way, my pinion angle is currenty 5.4 degrees. We are going to set that tomorrow, to 2-3 degrees negative. As far as the geometry goes, it took some work with the steel spacers/bushings that came with the JEGs arms on the frame end of the LCAs to get them lined up just right, left to right. The wheels fit perfectly in the wheel wells, more symmetrical than with my old rear end even.

Axles:

The axles slid right in beautifully. I pushed them in by hand and a light tap with a dead blow hammer got them in the last 1/8” or so.

Driveshaft:


My old drive shaft fit, too. However, because I didn’t have a 1310/1350 conversion U-joint, I didn’t put it in yet. I am going to get an aluminum driveshaft with 1350 u-joints in a few weeks, but for now I am putting the old one in. Plus, I want to adjust the pinion angle and the control arms and everything and remeasure so that my new driveshaft will fit perfectly. When I put it in I will add to this if there is any problem.


What did I learn:

1. It’s probably best to just spring for the brake kit

2. The installation requires machining and some skill. I couldn’t have done it in my garage at home.

3. Unless a guy is going to race his car quite a bit (for example I am running a 4-speed and DOT slicks), it’s probably best to go with a 12 bolt, especially if it comes complete, fully assembled with axles and brakes installed, etc. It really depends on the application and the level of technical skill you have or have access to. I would assume that a shop could have done it faster, but labor would have been over a $1,000 plus the machine work, if necessary.


Now that it’s in, I am of course really glad I went this route. The workmanship is excellent, and it’s heavy duty. I look forward to driving the snot out of it at the track (once the two feet of snow we got last night melts!).


Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,692 Posts
2 ft of snow in the Midwest? Where??? I bet the pumpkin falls out of it next go around after you hammer on it a bit and get those studs lined up ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Black Hills of South Dakota. Nothing like two feet on May Day! And tomorrow is supposed to be "clean up / prep" day at our track!

Bob, the studs are lined up. We worked it on VERY slowly. Is there something else we should do?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's funny!!!!

I will for sure hammer on it! That's one kind of hammerig that I am pretty good at!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
I can offer some additional info here. I did this conversion on my 67 El Camino last summer after fragging the 12 bolt.
I used a Moser housing and axles, with Quick Performance brake kit and center section. Spring for the brakes. If you think putting discs on the front is an improvement, wait till you get these BMF drums on the rear.
It was a straight forward bolt in. If anything, the housing from Moser fit better than the 12 bolt.I am using aftermarket control arms, and used the original driveshaft with the conversion u joint. This driveshaft was made for use with a Gear Vendor OD - the front yoke is a 1350 joint. Since I am running an automatic, I was less concerned about it breaking a conversion joint.
I made a new bracket to hold the soft line, which comes straight up from the front of the housing, and reused the stock setup with the new hard lines on the rear.
Agree a drain plug would have been a good idea.
I did not need to remove my exhaust - I could get the driveshaft out with out doing that. The studs can be a problem - I started them, then put the punkin in and pulled them the rest of the way in.
I am very happy with the setup, esp. since I no longer worry about breaking an axle and loosing a wheell!
John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,264 Posts
I can offer some additional info here. I did this conversion on my 67 El Camino last summer after fragging the 12 bolt.
I used a Moser housing and axles, with Quick Performance brake kit and center section. Spring for the brakes. If you think putting discs on the front is an improvement, wait till you get these BMF drums on the rear.
It was a straight forward bolt in. If anything, the housing from Moser fit better than the 12 bolt.I am using aftermarket control arms, and used the original driveshaft with the conversion u joint. This driveshaft was made for use with a Gear Vendor OD - the front yoke is a 1350 joint. Since I am running an automatic, I was less concerned about it breaking a conversion joint.
I made a new bracket to hold the soft line, which comes straight up from the front of the housing, and reused the stock setup with the new hard lines on the rear.
Agree a drain plug would have been a good idea.
I did not need to remove my exhaust - I could get the driveshaft out with out doing that. The studs can be a problem - I started them, then put the punkin in and pulled them the rest of the way in.
I am very happy with the setup, esp. since I no longer worry about breaking an axle and loosing a wheell!
John
What size wheel studs did you use? My son sheared all five of the original ones on the driver side, messed up the quarter panel some too, the second year he raced it. He put great big studs in and drilled out the 31 spline axles and didn't have any more trouble. (5/8" screw in studs, i think) He has since gone to 35 spline axles at my insistance but said the 31 spline axles are as large as the 35s until they neck down at the splines. The Currie 9" in my son's car has been very reliable and has been in the car for 13 years with no major problems except a "u" joint and those studs, didn't even hurt the axles when he broke the studs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
This is 99% street car. 6 - 8 trips to the strip this summer, on M/T Streets.
I am using stock diameter studs. Bigger might have been a better choice.
Tru-Trac.
Seals came with the housing and axles from Moser.
Currie's stuff is really nice, but pricey compared to some other suppliers.
John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Finished up yesterday. One thing I had to make were washers for the edl upper control arms. They have a clevis on the housing end, like the global west ones do. What's weird is that the bushings that came with the edls have a poly spacer that goes on the inside, between the housing ear and the clevis. It slides over the bushing sleeve. However, they don't stay there, obviously, since the clevis only presses on the one side, the front, of the spacer. So I made a big washer to put in there. That way I could still use the rubber spacer so that the clevis doesn't rub on the metal bushing sleeve. Anyway, it's weird that edl doesn't include something like that, since the rubber spacer is worthless without one and you'd have metal on metal without it. Never was an issue before since my no hops didn't have bushings.

The funny thing is that after we finished the upper control arms, we set each of them to equal length, 10 3/8". So we check the pinion angle and it's 2.6 degrees! Gotta love that.

Of course, we also decided to take an old bracket off one side of the frame that was used for mounting the right ladder bar, and when we finally wrenched it out, a few big chunks of frame came too. I should have taken a picture of it. So that took an hour to cut out and grind and weld a new piece in.

The really good news is that my car now has rear suspension. With the air bags and the lower control arms I had, it was pretty much locked up. Next on the list is front suspension and a new gas tank.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top