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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

My old man is the Chevelle guy but I've been trying to learn more about them so I can surprise him with a big gift (for putting up with my crap for a lot of decades now). I posted a little more in the welcome forum about that but figured I'd hop on here and see what you thought about some specific cars.

I saw this one on a dealership site and while it's outside of my comfort zone for price I've been really curious about it. If you watch the video towards the last half (starting around 4:54) a mechanic does a walkthrough. It looks great but there are a couple things that throw me off so I was just wondering what you guys think it might be worth: 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle | Classic Cars for Sale Michigan - Antique Muscle Car, Auto Sales, Buy Old Cars - Vanguard Motor Sales

Thanks very much
 

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I think you really have to look at what they sold for and not all the asking prices. I have a 66 that will change hands this month. I've queued people up starting in March of last year. People want specific years or year ranges. There's an issue of having a buyer ready when you are selling, number of buyers, etc...

You can find links showing 59K+ yet a few just went up on eBay and didn't hit 30K.

Most say 66/67 would be 30~40 running very good condition true SS. Non-SS drop 5~10k Not hard to find asking in the 35~45 range, but the real numbers are what they sold for over maybe 2 years and maybe get 30/40 sales to get a good idea.

I think the BB came in at 48K for awesome and 38 for very good.
 

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Options and quality play into selling price also, Matching numbers engine/running gear, ragtop, L78, show quality body/paint/interior, detailed engine compartment/undercarriage, original paperwork/Protect-o-plate/build sheet all factor into final selling price. All it takes is one buyer who just can't live without the car you're selling.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Perhaps you're only looking at '67's, but here is another option.

1969 Chevelle SS 396/375 h.p. L78
Beautiful car but it's gotta be a 67 this time around for sentimental reasons. My pops has been talking about the specific year he wants since as long as I can remember. Appreciate the link though, thanks.

There's a few on Ebay now like this one.

1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS | eBay
Thanks, that is around the price range I was hoping the black one would be. Seems like a good comparison and a 10-15k dealer mark up wouldn't surprise me.

I think you really have to look at what they sold for and not all the asking prices. I have a 66 that will change hands this month. I've queued people up starting in March of last year. People want specific years or year ranges. There's an issue of having a buyer ready when you are selling, number of buyers, etc...

You can find links showing 59K+ yet a few just went up on eBay and didn't hit 30K.

Most say 66/67 would be 30~40 running very good condition true SS. Non-SS drop 5~10k Not hard to find asking in the 35~45 range, but the real numbers are what they sold for over maybe 2 years and maybe get 30/40 sales to get a good idea.

I think the BB came in at 48K for awesome and 38 for very good.
Thanks KarlJay, those are really great points I hadn't considered. I'll start making a better record of comparables when I see sold ones. 38-48 seems reasonable for a range. I appreciate the help, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Options and quality play into selling price also, Matching numbers engine/running gear, ragtop, L78, show quality body/paint/interior, detailed engine compartment/undercarriage, original paperwork/Protect-o-plate/build sheet all factor into final selling price. All it takes is one buyer who just can't live without the car you're selling.
I actually never knew about the protect-o-plate until you mentioned it! Can't wait to bring that up with my dad next time he's talking cars. I'll use all these points when reviewing cars for sale from now on too, thanks very much Saltherring.
 

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It is somewhat rare to find a car with an original protect-o-plate...remembering these cars are 50 years old now. Most of us old guys just beat the hell out of them and then sold them off or parted out what was left. I did that to an L78 (396/375 hp) '66 back in the mid 70's.
 
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1966 Chevelle SS396
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It is somewhat rare to find a car with an original protect-o-plate...remembering these cars are 50 years old now. Most of us old guys just beat the hell out of them and then sold them off or parted out what was left. I did that to an L78 (396/375 hp) '66 back in the mid 70's.
Ugh. :crying: :(
 

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Ugh. :crying: :(
Yeah, sad but that's reality... Especially when you get to the L78... Not too many people bought the 375HP solid lifter engine just to putt around town. I know my '66 L78 had an engine/trans transplant well before I got it (several allegedly). I still have hope, as I was been told the original 396 was pulled for a built 427, instead of being blown up...
 

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Another issue is the age of the resto. I painted a truck 20 years ago and the age is really starting to show. It's not close to the 1st year after. Things fade over time.

I think Grr was very close to current market value and he sold quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It is somewhat rare to find a car with an original protect-o-plate...remembering these cars are 50 years old now. Most of us old guys just beat the hell out of them and then sold them off or parted out what was left. I did that to an L78 (396/375 hp) '66 back in the mid 70's.
Same with my dad and his 67. I grew up on stories of him beating it to all hell and swapping parts like nothing. It seemed like fun at least, being carefree with them and whatnot. Who knows, maybe they wouldn't be worth as much today if they hadn't been so much fun back then.

Speaking about the protect-o-plate, I just spotted one on ebay for this mint 67. Check out the "buy it now" price on that one.
 

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Same with my dad and his 67. I grew up on stories of him beating it to all hell and swapping parts like nothing. It seemed like fun at least, being carefree with them and whatnot. Who knows, maybe they wouldn't be worth as much today if they hadn't been so much fun back then.

Speaking about the protect-o-plate, I just spotted one on ebay for this mint 67. Check out the "buy it now" price on that one.
Most of us had no clue what would happen with certain cars. I can tell you that during the OPEC oil embargo (before my driving time) muscle cars were dropped like hot rocks and VW Bugs and Toyota's were all over the place.

I have a 66 SS and the engine was swapped to a 4 bolt block. That was clearly an upgrade. Now, it's a problem for some because my car isn't "numbers matching". Some think that because that exact block wasn't in the car at the time it was 1st sold, it's worth less money... Yet the 4 bolt engine was considered an upgrade.

It was very common for a guy to buy a car and start modifying it. I've cut a dash to put in a cassette player, cut doors for speakers... We really didn't know they'd be so collectable.
 

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The black car in your post shows all the signs of a basket case thrown together for quick re-sale, beginning with replaced trunk floor, cowl tag attached with pop rivets and much more, about double real value IMO. The Royal Plum car in post 3 looks interesting, looks more like a real car and could be nearer the mark on price. Educate your self on '67s (lot of good info here on T/C!) beware of dealer claims and wait for the right car to come along. Good Luck!!
 

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Speaking about the protect-o-plate, I just spotted one on ebay for this mint 67. Check out the "buy it now" price on that one.
That looks to be an original L78 car, which was the optional high horsepower 396. They only made 612 of those cars in '67, which is why it's priced so high. Beautiful car, & probably worth the buy-it-now. :yes:
 

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Most of us had no clue what would happen with certain cars. I can tell you that during the OPEC oil embargo (before my driving time) muscle cars were dropped like hot rocks and VW Bugs and Toyota's were all over the place.

I have a 66 SS and the engine was swapped to a 4 bolt block. That was clearly an upgrade. Now, it's a problem for some because my car isn't "numbers matching". Some think that because that exact block wasn't in the car at the time it was 1st sold, it's worth less money... Yet the 4 bolt engine was considered an upgrade.

It was very common for a guy to buy a car and start modifying it. I've cut a dash to put in a cassette player, cut doors for speakers... We really didn't know they'd be so collectable.
I agree...

And that's a large part of the reason as to why the cars with "matching numbers" are worth that much more today, because they aren't as common today... If every old Chevelle had its original engine, then it wouldn't be a big deal. Similar idea regarding "original" or survivor cars, as they are not too common today because there was a time with these were just "used cars". Not only the ones that are still around, but the ones that were modified or wrecked are that much harder to find...

I think of it as a double-edged sword; If these cars didn't become collectible, then even more would have been crushed, and then the aftermarket probably wouldn't exist... But that collectability has caused the values to rise...
 

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For what it's worth, I would really consider involving your dad in this decision. If he is a true Chevelle guy, he is probably very particular about what he likes. It would be a shame to get him a car that turns out to be something he really does not like. All Chevelles are not created equal (well, maybe created but not today....). There are way too many decisions to make on a purchase. You might be surprised what he really likes. He might enjoy the search with you. Just a thought.

Hey guys,

My old man is the Chevelle guy but I've been trying to learn more about them so I can surprise him with a big gift (for putting up with my crap for a lot of decades now). I posted a little more in the welcome forum about that but figured I'd hop on here and see what you thought about some specific cars.

I saw this one on a dealership site and while it's outside of my comfort zone for price I've been really curious about it. If you watch the video towards the last half (starting around 4:54) a mechanic does a walkthrough. It looks great but there are a couple things that throw me off so I was just wondering what you guys think it might be worth: 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle | Classic Cars for Sale Michigan - Antique Muscle Car, Auto Sales, Buy Old Cars - Vanguard Motor Sales

Thanks very much
 
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I agree...

And that's a large part of the reason as to why the cars with "matching numbers" are worth that much more today, because they aren't as common today... If every old Chevelle had its original engine, then it wouldn't be a big deal. Similar idea regarding "original" or survivor cars, as they are not too common today because there was a time with these were just "used cars". Not only the ones that are still around, but the ones that were modified or wrecked are that much harder to find...

I think of it as a double-edged sword; If these cars didn't become collectible, then even more would have been crushed, and then the aftermarket probably wouldn't exist... But that collectability has caused the values to rise...
I study business and economics. Sometimes I as people a question:
"If I could turn sand into gold, could I pay off the national debt?"
Many answer yes, which shows they don't understand.

Gold gets it's value because it's rare, if it weren't rare, it wouldn't have it's value.

Back during the DotCom era, many in Gov were saying everyone should be a Java programmer because of all the business in Web Dev.

The problem with this is that we keep raising the bar. If the ability to do web dev was as common as the ability to tie shoes, it would have the same value as tying shoes.

Smart businesses know this and use this to enslave people. People end up working hard and hard to get the same thing.

150 years ago, a man with an ax could be home free in 1/2 year by building his own home. Now it takes great credit, a big down payment, and a 30 year loan. ... We've gone from 1/2 a year, to 1/2 your life to get the same thing.

People have allowed themselves to be enslaved by business and government without even realizing it. Meanwhile the Gov is looting the system thru debt.

... and now back to our regularly scheduled program ...
 
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