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If you hook it up on that terminal it will only have power when the lights are on. To hold time it will need constant power or the BAT terminal.
 

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66 Chevelle SS396 & 66 Chevelle 327 Convertible.
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Discussion Starter #3
Guess I wasn't to clear. The circuit that the clock is on is the same as the light circuit, which has a 10 amp fuse. I was told that when the battery gets low, it will not have enough juice to kick the relay open in the clock; but will still fee 10 amps to the clock. The result being that the mags get burned and the clock is shot.This is not a quarts clock; it has the original NOS mag set up. Was told to take it off that circuit and to run a hot wire to it with a 2amp fuse and put in a cut-off switch that I can use to shut of power to the clock when I store the car during the winter?
 

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Sounds like some ol' wives tale to me.

The clock is going to act the very same no matter what the fuse size.

Not sure what size fuse a 66 clock had originally but you don't want one any larger than the original for sure.

Which light circuit?

Head, tail, and instrument lights only have power when the head light switch is pulled out a notch or two like John said.
 

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Jim,
I think your worrying for nothing, if your worried about the 10amp fuse and burning up the coils when the points stick, just stick a 2amp inline fuse in front of the clock, and if something should happen it goes and you don't have to worry about burning up your coils before the 10amp fuse blows.

mine is the original clock also. I just installed a very small toggle switch on the hot wire of my clock that I can reach under the edge of my console and get to.

I don't know how much experience you have with these clocks, but parts are not something you can access very easy, and they are becoming more scarce every day. With the toggle you can run your clock when you want to, and that way it's not setting in your garage wearing its self out.

With this method you will never need to worry about fixing it again. By the way, did you contact the man I gave you the number of in Lenexa Kansas to get your clock fixed?


Rocky
 

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Rocky hit the nail on the head!

Yes, you do want a low-amp quick-blo fuse in series with the clock power. A factory original RESTORED clock needs added protection. Connect the power feed to the original location: the 20 amp courtesy fuse feed. Then splice an in-line fuse holder in the power feed. Insert a standard fuse, no higher than 3 amps. The toggle switch is optional, but a very good idea, especially if you have your vehicle mostly in storage. The coil will fry if the contact points seize, or there is a low voltage condition in the vehicle (weak battery in storage). The 2-3 amp fuse will pop before the coils inside do, this would never happen with the 20 amp fuse box fuse.
 

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Yes Dean :D

To clarify, the factory connected the clock to the "courtesy circuit", this feeds the dome light, cigarette lighter, etc. This is "HOT" at all times, and what you would want for a clock. The courtesy circuit is protected by a 20 amp fuse. So, the clock has virtually no protection as by the time the 20 amp goes, the clock is long gone!
 

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Not that 5 more amps matter to the clock, because at this point it's long gone anyway, my 1966 wiring diagram shows the clock on a 15 amp circuit that covers the Tail, Stop, Courtesy, Glove Box, License Plate, Dome Light, and Clock.


Rocky
 
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