Team Chevelle banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
240 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I'm approaching the end of my budget for restoring my '70 Malibu and I'm looking for sources of income to fund my habit.(I'm not addicted... I can quit anytime... yeah, right)
Anyway, I'm looking at the 1966 283 V8 that I pulled out of another car back in 1980 or so. I ran it for a couple of years. It's complete with original "Chevrolet" valve covers, air cleaner, etc. It ran fine when I pulled it.
Is a 283 considered hard-to-come-by or are they fairly common? This would make a difference in what I could get for it. Any idea what it might be worth?
Thanks, TK
ps: this is not a forsale ad; just an inquiry - thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
For a comparison, I pulled a 283/PG out of the 67 Malibu I am building into a clone. I sold the very tired motor and PG to a mechanic for $200 just to not have to take up room in the garage. He said he could build up a 67 302 for a Camaro using this engine. Wouldn't think the heads are correct, but evidently the block is the same?
Not up on smallblocks, maybe someone else can piece it together. May be a way to sell it anyway.
John Walker
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
240 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John,
I know what you're talking about. I had a Nova years ago that someone tried this trick on. It never lived up to the expectation however. I seem to recall it was a 327 block, 283 crank, and 202 heads was supposed to = approximately a Z28 motor.

Anyway, is a 283 of value to a restorer?

Thanks TK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
TK-70, I have a steel crank 283 and a powerglide that I pulled from my 64 with just a little over 100,000 on it. Never bored.
I'm curious to hear the reponses to your post too.
Bill

------------------
Long time Chevelle fan and an owner since 1973 :)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,375 Posts
ah, the poor old 283. Such a good engine, but they just don't hold the value.

Pricing? Well, you don't see a lot of them forsale, but here is the issue to me:

If someone is going to restore a mid 60's car with a 283, chances are the engine is still in the car, and matching numbers at that. If the 283 is gone, it's usually not worth the effort to find a 'correct' 283. It seems they all get a 350 or a big block once the original 283 or 327 is gone. This leaves quite a few perfectly fine 283's sitting in the back of garages all over North America.
I've never got much money for them, seems most people I know have one lying around somewhere, we all talk about what a reliable engine they were, but they aren't really worth rebuilding as 283's.

Not trying to discourage you from getting a good buck for it Tom, but a 2bbl, 283 that was mated to a PGlide just doesn't stir the blood these days.

ps, check the block code and see what it was originally installed and mated to. There are some rarer ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
622 Posts
I happen to like the much disparaged 283 - If y'all have some in the way, I will haul them off to clear your garage. Simply a good hearted public service.E-mail me I'll come get em.(If not too far away.)
I would imagine a real restorer may pay anything for the correct date code stock 283 if that is what they need. The more stock the better. BUT, these last forever and are easily rebuilt - when is the last time you heard of a totally ruined 283 ?The demand is not too high.

------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Have a 1965 Malibu numbers matching which we have owned for 33 years. Going to rebuild the 283! This engine started after sitting for 14 years. Yes, it was started 2-3 times a year to keep it 'alive'. I can't think about anything other than the original motor. Long live the 283!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
240 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like a similar story everywhere. The old 283s just run and run...
I bought it with 90K miles on it and pulled it out when it had approx 122K on it. Ran like a charm.
To Al's question - I know where it came from. It's not a glamorous story or a rare find. I bought a '66 Bel Air with a rotted frame and I pulled the 283 out of it. Probably the 190hp version. I dropped it into my '72 SS while I saved the cash to rebuild my 454. When the 454 was ready, I swapped them back. The 283 has been sitting ever since.
I share your view on the topic though - if an original 283 died, it's likely to be replaced with something bigger and stronger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
After all the words have been said, there are 100,000 283's laying around. It was a super engine in it's time, but it's time has run out. There not worth rebuilding. Go for the 350, but not the new Chevy crate engines, they are smog engines and run "HOT". I've been there. Find a older year 350.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I bet if you run an add in the paper. Some old timer will be there the next day to pick it up. Might not be worth rebuilding to some, but them old timers know that it's a reliable motor and one of the best ever made. Get a 350 is everyones answer. I'll probably get one myself.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top