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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got started on my first engine rebuild project. I have 350 chevy .60 over. I got it back from the shop and wanted to know if anyone has any thoughts on whether "Hyper-lites" are as good or better than forged pistons and are "floating pin" pistons as good or better than pressed pin pistons?

Also do I really need to have the engine balanced? I have heard from some its a must and others tell me its a waste of money unless im going to be racing it every week.

the motor is going in my 71 Malibu as a weekend cruiser, Its just a 2 bolt main but I hope to generate at least 350 hp with this motor.

Any comments, suggestions greatly appreciated.
 

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Chip,
Hyperutectic pistons are not quite as strong as forged, but are fine for most street and mild strip applications. Check out this link: http://www.kb-silvolite.com/

Floating pins are not really any better, just easier for racers who are taking the motor apart often for maintainance reasons. Most people will tell you that pressed pins are actually stronger and one less place for wear.
Balancing is mandatory anytime you change the weights of components in the motor, such as pistons or rods.
Hope this helps,

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Bill Koustenis
Advanced Automotive Machine
Waldorf Md

1971 Heavy Chevy - original owner
Team Chevelle #100
 

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do yourself a favor ...

go to amazon.com and buy "how to rebuild small block chevy engine" and "how to hot rod small block chevys" ...

both are published by HP Books

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Rich
Cocoa Beach, Fla
Team Chevelle #380
[email protected]
www.chevelles.com/showroom/70_SS_454.jpg
 

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Things I wish someone had told me when I built my first motor:

1. Research, Research, Research
2. The torque converter seats three times before it's fully installed (motor only had 600 miles on it--giant paper weight now)
3. Don't rush through anything
4. Ask for help, but make sure they know what they're doing too
5. Your machinist is one of your best resources for information (mine was!)
6. Your car will never be "finished"--there will always be one more thing you can do (don't let that drive you NUTS!)
7. Never underestimate the power of the break-in period
8. If you do go with hypereut pistons--file gap, file gap, file gap and see #7

Other than that, get yourself those books and have a blast!

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--Amanda :)

Proud owner of a 68 ElCam

"Sometimes the only reason to get out of bed in the morning is to wear a new shirt."
 

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chp, if your going to try and get 350HP out of your engine, then I would strongly advise you to balance all rotating parts. It will make a world of difference in how it runs.
I hope you already purchased the pistons, seeing as you got the block bored.
What part of Calif. are you in?

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Lynn Robinson
Pacheco, Calif.
64 Malibu SS, 71 Camaro SS
"Just Hit the Ball and Touch em All"
Team Chevelle Member #246
 

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Don't go crazy with your cam selection, if you want a little choppy idle, get a Comp Cams 268 or 270, or something close.Don't go above 224 duration at .050 lift. Hypereutectics will be fine, get them before boring your block.Get a matching set of valve springs, Z28 springs are good for this cam. Get it balanced.

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1972 Malibu (1 st. car) Project waiting to happen / Team Chevelle # 427 / A.C.E.S. # 1282
 

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Don't worry about floating pins.
Get those books!
Get it balanced (you'll be MUCH happier and it doesn't cost all that much more when the total comes out).
Hyper pistons are fine for a mild perf motor.

Amanda,
What's this torque converter seating thing? I've never done one of those, just clutches. I'm curious so I don't screw it up years down the road.

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Tom H.
Member #259
Indianapolis,IN www.iquest.net/~bharold/chevelle/
 

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Abosorb all information you can like a sponge! I also think it can use repeating: the initial break-in of the engine is the most important hours, and miles in an engine's life, take it very seriously. I normally wouldn't repeat something like this, except I have read a few posts lately that include the lines "I had the motor running at 2500 rpm's breaking in the cam, and when I came back outside . . . . . " What in the heck else was so important that you couldn't give your undivided attention to your new engine during it's "birth"????? Oh well, you get my point! Another bit of advice - if you are following instructions to the letter, following all procedures, and had everything machined right,and something doesn't seem to go together right, it's probably not right! Don't MAKE things fit, if it's not right, investigate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanx for the suggestions, I got the book "How to rebuild the small block chevy", and will be using it as I go. I havent got all the parts yet as I am taking this really slow so I don't screw anything up. Again thanx for the help and I'll be sure to post more "help needed" topics. I'm sure I will need plenty of advice.
 

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SSteve brought up an excellent point about leaving a new engine unattended during break-in. Here's some of the best pieces of advice my father ever gave me regarding my 1967 Chevelle (and cars in general):

1. Never walk away from a car you aren't familiar with while it's running.
2. Always have some way to put out a fire handy and don't be afraid to use it.
3. Measure twice, cut once (applies to cars just as well as woodworking).
4. Money doesn't necessarily equal horsepower or quality.
5. If the engine temp needle hasn't moved, neither should you.
6. When in doubt, GAS IT!
7. Even ol' Smokey asked for help and advice and you're no better than he is.
8. The Chevrolet small block isn't just an engine, it's a work of art.
9. Never punch out more out of the cylinder than you have to.
10. Always carry a 1/2-9/16 combo in the glove box.

Turbodog
Houston, TX
 

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My 2 Yen worth...If it's your first, try and find some experience to literally look over your shoulder...Check your neighborhood, there's probably a mechanic within a block or 2 who's put together more than a few motors...and they often love to impart their knowledge to people like yourself who are willing to listen and learn (just check out how many posting have been put on this web site today! Now that's a Thanksgiving feast!)...You can't ask a book questions like "am I doing this right?"

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68 El Camino...Slow, Much Work Required
98 Z28...Fast, No Work Required
Goodfellow AFB, San Angelo, TX -- Where? That's what I said..
 

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My advice to someone inexperienced overhauling an engine is take your time.If needed take some pictures and take your time.Keep a record of what you are doing and OH did I say take your time.The book will help but don't be afraid to ask questions and take your time...FRED
 

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I had a lot of trouble just reading the dial bore gauge.Every time I took a measurement it was different!That's when I decided to have it done by a professional.Best decision I ever made
 

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Turbodog--Re: rule #3; I've cut this @#%! piece twice and it's STILL too short!! What do you make of it?

Bryan

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'65 Malibu frame-off project(slow going!)
'70 C-20 Longhorn p/u (daily driver)
 
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