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Discussion Starter · #61 ·

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Still haven't gotten the bolts out, but haven't really tried. Today was super busy with having to juggle four tuning customers, but I did did get a few more parts.

I have mentioned it before, but part of the goal is to get the AC system fully functioning. It is an older VA Super Gen II system, but I see no reason why it can't work as it should. Another thing that I want to do is fully integrate the AC system with the Holley ECU. Today I received some of the parts to do that.

This is a new drier that I got from BP Automotive. What makes it unique is that it has both a binary switch for the compressor and it has a GM pressure sensor.





The binary switch will work as a safety for the compressor. The AC pressure switch will be an input to the Terminator X and will allow me to integrate AC as part of the cooling fan control.



I also picked up these pressure sensor connectors from EFI Connection. These connectors are pretty standard for GM and aftermarket 5v pressure transducers. What makes these a little unique is the little lip that is molded at the end of the connector. I plan to modify a lot of the Holley EFI harness and part of the modification will be sealing off the sections of harness for the pressure sensors. These sections of harness will be encapsulated in Raychem Dr25 heat shrink tubing and the connectors will have heat shrink boots on them.





Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Getting a box from Waytek is just as exciting as getting a box from Summit Racing...

I got a bunch of terminals, cable seals, relays, and a few other goodies.





First up is this die set for my Waytek branded crimping tool. This die works on Weatherpack and Metripack (and GT) terminals up to 10 gauge. It crimps the wire and the cable seal in one operation. Can't wait to try it out!





Next up are a couple of my favorite Bussmann panels. These are the dual bus variety. I plan to use one under the dash and add another one in the engine bay for headlights.





Lastly are these heat shrink bulkhead passthroughs made by TE Connectivity. I plan to use the large one for the ECU harness and the smaller ones for anything else that needs to come through the firewall.





The large one is made for a 2" hole and the smaller ones are for .75" hole.

Andrew
 

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Andrew,
Nice! I just got my Waytek delivery as well! It was like Christmas! They have the Bussman relay panel? They were hopelessly out of stock on most Eaton items, so I got mine elsewhere. Still waiting for the buss connection caps. They said May, maybe. Waytek was awesome to deal with. Very friendly customer service rep.

Those one step jaws look real slick! What frames do they work with?

Since I’ve pretty much decided to mount my ECU in the engine bay, somewhere, I won’t need to worry about creating a huge pass through for the harness, but I do need to pass the hand held screen cable through. Love the idea of the “conduit” type pass through! Real slick! Are they sold individually? The Waytek catalog is a dangerous thing!!

Joe
 
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Andrew,
Nice! I just got my Waytek delivery as well! It was like Christmas! They have the Bussman relay panel? They were hopelessly out of stock on most Eaton items, so I got mine elsewhere. Still waiting for the buss connection caps. They said May, maybe. Waytek was awesome to deal with. Very friendly customer service rep.

Those one step jaws look real slick! What frames do they work with?

Since I’ve pretty much decided to mount my ECU in the engine bay, somewhere, I won’t need to worry about creating a huge pass through for the harness, but I do need to pass the hand held screen cable through. Love the idea of the “conduit” type pass through! Real slick! Are they sold individually? The Waytek catalog is a dangerous thing!!

Joe
Hey Joe,

I actually sourced the panels from a seller on Amazon, since Waytek, and it seems everyone else, was out of them.

The die is for the Pressman frame:

The TE Connectivity passthroughs are on page 85 of the catalog, top right. You are definitely right about the catalog being dangerous, but once you work with quality wiring supplies, there is no going back!

Andrew
 
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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Today was a nice day, so I rolled the GTO out into the driveway and decided to tackle stropping down the rest of the engine. Made a quick trip to the parts store to rent a power steering pulley puller and a balancer puller.



Got the PS pulley off without any issues, which allowed me to take the alternator bracket off.



My 20v Dewalt 1/2" impact gun made quick work of the balancer bolt and I managed to get the balancer off without any drama, although I apparently didn't get any pictures of that.



Next it was time to tackle the stuck engine mount adapter plate bolts. I went to my local big box home improvement store and got a torch. Sadly, this did absolutely nothing. There was just too much metal to heat up and the block being aluminum dissipated the heat very quickly.



It was time to get serious. I got my angle grinder out and installed a fresh cutoff disk and went to work. The plan was to slot the head of the bolts and also cut through the engine mount adapter plates. Once the cut was made, I used a chisel to split the engine mount plates to relieve the pressure against underside of the bolts. I was still able to use the 6mm allen wrench.



This worked like a charm. Rinse and repeat 7 more times.



I managed to mostly stay clear of the block, with only a couple of little nicks, but this won't be a problem.



All the bolts had plenty of anti-seize on them, which I liberally applied 12 years ago to avoid just this scenario.



Good riddance!



Andrew
 
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I love that last picture.
I actually said a enthusiastic "yes!" when I scrolled down as reading it.
knowing how much a pain in the a$$ some of the simple things can become.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
I love that last picture.
I actually said a enthusiastic "yes!" when I scrolled down as reading it.
knowing how much a pain in the a$$ some of the simple things can become.
Thank you. The gesture seemed rather appropriate. :)

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
What in the world is happening here? :)





Johnny is very curious...



Andrew
 
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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Today was a pretty productive day in the garage. The big goal was to clear out some stuff out and make better use of the limited space that I have. The first order of business was to get the QuickJacks off the floor. I ordered the wall mounting brackets when I bought the QuickJacks and they worked very well.



The next step was to clear out the space on the right side of the garage, so the work bench is more accessible without having to move the car out on the driveway.



Luckily, many of the things in the garage are on casters, so things are easy to move around. The big bench got moved from the left side of the car and the tool box went in its place.



This gives me fairly decent space on either side of the car, and a nice area to the right, where I can work on the engine and anything else that will come up.



I then spent some time with some degreaser and cleaned up the block. It turned out pretty well. Tomorrow I will get some acetone and go over the block again.





FedEx also made a delivery today from Summit Racing. I got the Summit "Ghost" cam with some dual valve springs and matching pushrods.



I also got a Burgeson 12:1 steering box.



It was a long day for Johnny. #lifeishard



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Pulled the rockers, push rods and spark plugs in order to proceed with the cam swap.



I also dropped the oil pan so that when I rotate the engine upside down, whatever oil was in the pan didn't start dripping out all over the place.



Rotated the crank so that #1 cylinder was at TDC on the compression stroke.



The crank and cam gears are dot to dot and the dowel pin is at 3 o'clock.



Pulled the oil pump off and the cam gear. Used a long water pump bolt to help pull the cam.



LS7 cam on the left, Summit "ghost" cam on the right.



Having the engine upside down prevents the lifters from dropping down. Also checked the cam bearings and they looked good.



Before installing the new cam, I wiped it down with acetone and then lubed it up with motor oil.



Cam gear, timing chain, and chain guide installed. With the engine upside down, the dowel is at the 9 o'clock position.



Next up is the oil pan installation.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I have been taking a ton of pictures along the way, and hopefully y'all won't mind the details.

With the AutoKraft pan, I was able to use a full length (truck style) windage tray. You can see in this picture how the windage tray interferes with the new Holley pickup tube.



I took it off for modifications. (more on this later)



I also picked up the 302-12 road race baffle kit. Not that I plan to do a lot of racing with this car, but it is always good to have a pan with good oil control.





It's a very nice piece with thoughtfully designed trap doors do keep the pickup tube covered with oil as much as possible.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Holley provided an instruction sheet with the 302-3 oil pan, including a dimensional drawing as to how the windage tray trimming was to be done.





After some quality time with the whizzwheelofdeath, the windage tray was chopped.



Here you can see how the pickup tube fits snugly in the space created and the flange sits flush against the oil pump.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Last post of the day, which brings us to the end of the day, yesterday...

With much enthusiasm, I popped the oil pan into place, only to find it was hanging up on something. There is no gasket, obviously, but the gasket is only about 1/8".









Nothing was jumping out at me, so instead of beating my head against the wall, I went inside the house and had a few bourbons...

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Yesterday morning I tackled the oil pan issue with renewed enthusiasm. I got the big guns out to figure out where exactly the interference was. I stuck some play doh on the 3 likely places and placed the pan on the engine.



The pick-up tube clearance looks good.



The front of the pick-up tube also looks good.



Houston, we have a problem.



Turn out it was #usererror. I didn't trim back the windage tray far enough in this area. So after a few minutes of quality time with the whizzwheelofdeath, I had enough clearance that the pan sat flat against the engine block, even without a oil pan gasket.



Andrew
 
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The 302-3 pan must be even shallower than a -2 pan in that area. I cut my windage tray strait across and didn't have any clearance issues. The -3 must have more tie rod clearance than the -2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
The 302-3 pan must be even shallower than a -2 pan in that area. I cut my windage tray strait across and didn't have any clearance issues. The -3 must have more tie rod clearance than the -2.
The 302-3 is a little shallower in the front than the 302-2, and also has provisions for turbo oil drains on both side and can accommodate up to a 4" stroker crank.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
With the windage tray properly trimmed, the oilpan now sat flat against the block. The addition of the gasket raised it up a little higher, so I was confident that nothing was touching.



Then it was time to focus on the front cover. I purchased some nifty alignment tools when I built the Cougar, which I didn't think I would use again, but they sure came in handy here. I popped the old seal out of the cover and used the alignment tool to center the front cover on the crank.



With the front cover centered, I used a straight edge to align the cover with the block and snugged up the bolts.



Now that the front cover was tightened down against the block, I loosely installed a new front seal.



The alignment tool also serves as the perfect installation tool for the front seal. Using a dead blow hammer, I tapped it in all the way.



Sorted....



Andrew
 
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