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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
....

Question, when you use the angle altering booster bracket, will you need to drill a new hole for your brake rod? Does the loss of angle affect the amount of mechanical advantage applied to the booster?

Joe
Joe,

Great question. I don't know the answer first hand, but a friend of mine installed this combination of parts on his 70 GTO and he said he had zero issues. I will eventually find out first hand...LOL

Andrew
 

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Please do post your findings. I’m interested in losing some of the angle of my MC but all my lines are plumbed so.....

Joe
 

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I installed the McLeod kit, and had to open up the hole in the firewall to get the MC rod to run straight into the pedal. I dont think the angle of the rod will change the mechanical advantage, as that is governed by the hydraulics. What an angle on the MC rod will likely do is put stress on the seal and create premature wear and leaks. It could also create binding, which will make the pedal effort higher due to the friction of the bind.
 

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Serious question, why does the power brake system utilize an angle while the non power brake system Lots perpendicular to the firewall?

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Serious question, why does the power brake system utilize an angle while the non power brake system Lots perpendicular to the firewall?

Joe
Joe,

I think it has to do with the position of the push rod on the pedal. With manual brakes the rod is in the upper hole on the pedal, giving a straight shot at the MC. With power brakes, the push rod is in the lower hole on the pedal and angling the booster and MC gives a direct shot.

Also, if anyone is interested, I am selling the engine that I currently have in the GTO:


Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Not much interest in my engine, so it will just probably be a cam swap and call it a day...

Another thing that I plan to do is implement PWM cooling fan control. This is sure easy to do with any Holley EFI system (except Sniper). I can keep my current fans and add a C6 fan controller (probably need two) or I may upgrade the fans to the latest brushless design (I have some Chevy Volt fans that might fit well).

The fan control strategy will also integrate AC and vehicle speed. I have this working on my Cougar already, although without AC integration. Here is a video to see how it works in action:

[video]

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Spring is definitely coming, but the weather is still pretty crappy. In the meantime, I opted to make my life a little easier. Working in a small garage will be hard enough, so having some extra help will be good. The thought of trying to get on every corner of the car with a jack sounds painful.

Since I can't have a lift, I decided on these:





This is the 5000 pound extended model. After looking at the dimensions and comparing them to my GTO frame, these seemed to be the right option. They will also work well with my Cougar and the other daily drivers in the fleet.

Andrew
 

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Spring is definitely coming, but the weather is still pretty crappy. In the meantime, I opted to make my life a little easier. Working in a small garage will be hard enough, so having some extra help will be good. The thought of trying to get on every corner of the car with a jack sounds painful.

Since I can't have a lift, I decided on these:





This is the 5000 pound extended model. After looking at the dimensions and comparing them to my GTO frame, these seemed to be the right option. They will also work well with my Cougar and the other daily drivers in the fleet.

Andrew
From who and how much? Looks to be right up my alley also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
From who and how much? Looks to be right up my alley also.
They were about $1300 shipped. QuickJacks was having a $150 off sale. I got it directly from them.

Andrew
 
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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
My friend Brian flew in from Chicago on Friday night to help me get the engine and transmission extracted from the GTO. He is a professional diesel generator mechanic and works super fast. He was the one that helped me pull the big block out of the GTO when I did the LS swap back in 2008.

We drove to the storage unit in the morning to bring the car to my house. The weather was supposed to be decent, but it was still a little wet from the previous night's rain.











First order of business is to remove the hood and have it in a relatively secure location. We had a lot of moving blankets left from our move and those came in very handy.









While Brian was getting all of the little things unbolted and the harness unplugged, I was working on assembling and bleeding the QuickJacks.











The QuickJacks work as advertised. Once they were bled and positioned under the GTO frame, all it took was a press of the button and it went up in the air in about 10 seconds. This sure beats jacking up each corner with a floor jack and then positioning jack stands under each corner.

If I had one complaint it would be that getting access under the car in the middle is rather limited. You can only get under it from the front or rear, which makes getting to the transmission a little cumbersome. However, the car is up high enough that if we had 2 low profile rollers, it would be pretty easy to get anywhere under the car. I don't regret the purchase and I think these will be used a lot.

...........
 
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
The engine plate was bolted over the valley cover with the supplied longer bolts. This made it a lot easier because the valley cover didn't have to be fully removed.



With everything unhooked on the bottom, it was time to hook up the hoist and get the engine and transmission out. A big thanks to Ron for lending me the hoist, engine stand, and transmission jack. All three were invaluable.









The engine was put on the stand, everything got tidied up, and the GTO was rolled into the garage. The space is pretty tight, but the driveway is huge. The plan is to roll the car out on nice days and just work on it a little bit at a time. Having a lot of working space around the car will minimize the chances of damage, etc...

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
The current layout of the dash is functional, but the gauges have a bit of an outdated look.



So to bring it up todays standards, I decided to replace them with Holley analog CAN gauges.



Both the speedometer and the tach will be connected to the Terminator X ECU and all data will go over the CAN bus. This makes installation super simple and clean. The fuel gauge will go in place of the FJO wideband gauge. It is a fully programmable gauge and will work well with the OEM sender that is a part of the 5th gen Camaro ZL1 pump module that I plan to use.

I also received the oil pan baffle kit and a line lock kit for when I want to smoke the tires...:)





Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 · (Edited)
How does that age old question go?

"How do you eat an elephant?"

We all know, the answer: "One bite at a time."

Yesterday I went to the garage and just started looking around. A project of this size is pretty daunting, but I have to start somewhere. I saw my radiator sitting off to the side and then saw the Chevy Volt fans that I bought last summer at a local JY. So I thought I would see how the two go together.

Here is the set-up I've had on the car for almost 20 years. It is a huge BeCool radiator and dual SPAL fans.



The fans attach with nice little brackets that capture the top and bottom of the radiator core.



Once the old fans assembly was removed, I just placed the Volt fans on the core. I always thought I had 12" fans, but looking at the Volt dual 12" fans, it is clear that mine were either 10 or 11 inch fans.



The bottom of the Volt fans assembly is a little tab that was getting in the way.



I used a saw I had handy and just cut it off.



With the tab cut off, the fan assembly looks like it was made for this radiator. The fit is spot on!



I proceeded to strip the Volt wiring loom to the bare essentials. You can see here a close-up of the round Yazaki connectors for each fan. Each plug has three terminals. There is a power and ground and a small PWM signal wire.



The shroud has many bosses where the loom can be secured for a neat installation.



To mount the fan assembly, I am going to weld some tabs at the bottom to capture the lower tangs, and threaded bosses at the top where the fan assembly will bolt to the radiator.

The reason for going with these fans is that they are absolute monsters. Each fan is rated at 300 watts, which I am pretty sure is triple of what the old fans were. The other reason is that these fans are PWM controlled and there is no need for an external controller. The little signal wires will be connected directly to an output from my Holley Terminator X ECU, and I will program the fan speed based on coolant temperature, A/C pressure, and vehicle speed.

The radiator core is 27 3/8" wide and 18" tall, although I have some caps that protect the top and bottom of the core, making the effective available height 17 1/4" tall.

Andrew
 
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Damn, that does fit like it was made for it!

Joe
 
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
The weather was really nice this weekend, so I decided to mess around with the engine a little bit. Popped the valve covers off just to do a visual inspection. Everything looked really good.







Pulled the spark plugs and they all look like this. Also pretty good.



The counter sunk bolts that hold the engine mount adapter plates to the engine are going to be a problem. I got one loose, but the rest are stuck pretty good. I broke one 3/8" drive 6mm allen wrench in the process.

I am soaking them with some PB Blaster, so I hope that does the trick. If not, might have to add some heat.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Use an Impact screw driver with the Allen bit. Not a pneumatic driver, a hammer impact driver.

Just an example TEKTON 2905 3/8-Inch Drive Manual Hand Impact Driver Set, 7-Piece - Screwdriver Bit Sets - Amazon.com

Also, when you re-assemble, use Never-seize on the threads for the aluminum block.
Thanks for the tip! I have one of those somewhere...

I actually did use anti-seize, like I always do with steel hardware going into aluminum. I think they are actually rusted on the cone, where it seats into the adapter bracket. Someone also suggested using a flat faced punch to give the head a few firm taps.

Looks like I have a few options to try.

Can anyone recommend a product for cleaning the aluminum block? I don't mean a degreaser, but something that will liven up the casting.

Andrew
 
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