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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
Im trying to learn as much as I can so I figured I would hop on here. Im 25 years old and I finally got my Dads 1970 Chevelle that’s been sitting for 15 years since he passed. It sat for so long because my uncle moved away so it stayed where it was and wasn’t spoken about. Recently, my uncle (his brother) tried to take it from me and I couldn’t let that happen. He actually did take it down to SC from NY but called me a week later and said if I want it that bad pay to have it sent back up, which I immediately did. But anyway I was wondering if we could identify the car and what it was original? Can anyone tell me how they would approach this first and where I should be focused on? Extremely new to this and want to keep his legacy going
I appreciate any feedback thanks so much.
 

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Welcome! You now have a pretty badass car.. as well as a new hobby 🙂

This is for sure the right place to get info about these cars.

One thing I just happened to notice right away is, the breather is missing from the passenger side valve cover. Not a big deal (it's a very inexpensive part).. just happened to see it.

I would be careful starting it up for the first time (unless somebody already did). Others will have more experience / knowledge than I do around how necessary this is, but if I were to do it myself, I'd probably change the oil and then prime the oil pump before starting (using a special tool that attaches to a drill and goes down the distributor hole). I would imagine the bearings are probably a little dry by now.

Also, unless you know for sure that it has a roller cam, I would add the zinc additive to your oil. Before.. the 90s?.. oil came with zinc to protect flat tappet cams, but it doesn't have that today.
 

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Central Iowa
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Good boy for speaking up!
Did you get or got the title for the car? very important before you do much of anything!
And you need to get it registered in your name! ASAP
It's your legacy now as it should be!
Did your uncle not tell you anything about the car/engine?
I would think he would have tried to get it running.
Maybe you should ask him...
 

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Hey guys,
Im trying to learn as much as I can so I figured I would hop on here. Im 25 years old and I finally got my Dads 1970 Chevelle that’s been sitting for 15 years since he passed. It sat for so long because my uncle moved away so it stayed where it was and wasn’t spoken about. Recently, my uncle (his brother) tried to take it from me and I couldn’t let that happen. He actually did take it down to SC from NY but called me a week later and said if I want it that bad pay to have it sent back up, which I immediately did. But anyway I was wondering if we could identify the car and what it was original? Can anyone tell me how they would approach this first and where I should be focused on? Extremely new to this and want to keep his legacy going
I appreciate any feedback thanks so much.
Hello, Glad to hear that you was able to get it back, sorry for your lost. For starters here is a link that you can use to decode your vin CHEVELLESTUFF VIN Decoder.
 

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Rochester, New York
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Sorry for your loss of your dad, and I'm happy you have an interest in getting his classic car going. Your memories of your dad will be strengthened over time when you enjoy his old Chevelle.

Sitting for 15 years is never a good thing for a car, but that doesn't ruin it either. It is going to take some elbow grease and some money to get her going again, but that car looks like it will be worth it. You don't say how good your mechanical aptitude is - but you will enjoy learning as you go! I would try to get it running first off and work from there.

I would start by getting all the old gas out of the system as you could possibly do more harm than good by trying to run it on that old, varnished gas. If it hasn't been cranked over after 15 years, there is probably nothing left in the carburetor, so drop the gas tank, empty it, then flush some new gas thru it, then reinstall. Then it will take some cranking to get the new fuel up to fill the carburetor, so be patient.

You'll need to be weary of fluid leaks from old hoses. This means gas leaks, antifreeze leaks, brake line leaks, automatic tranny lines, and so on. If you do get it running again, after that you can concentrate on what it will take to make it a safe car to drive.

Your car has SS badges on it, but that does not mean it came from the factory as a SS car. Anybody could have put SS badging on a lesser model Chevelle to make it look like a real SS. There is no easy way to tell on a 70 if it was born that way unless you have documentation matching the cars VIN with the build sheet. Hopefully - maybe - your dad had that documentation. If not - no biggy. You will still enjoy your dad's old classic car, no matter how it was built at the factory.

Welcome to Tean Chevelle and enjoy your new hobby!
 
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Hey guys,
Im trying to learn as much as I can so I figured I would hop on here. Im 25 years old and I finally got my Dads 1970 Chevelle that’s been sitting for 15 years since he passed. It sat for so long because my uncle moved away so it stayed where it was and wasn’t spoken about. Recently, my uncle (his brother) tried to take it from me and I couldn’t let that happen. He actually did take it down to SC from NY but called me a week later and said if I want it that bad pay to have it sent back up, which I immediately did. But anyway I was wondering if we could identify the car and what it was original? Can anyone tell me how they would approach this first and where I should be focused on? Extremely new to this and want to keep his legacy going
I appreciate any feedback thanks so much.
I saw where one individual mentioned the build sheet to determine where your car came from and how it was built. I found an original build sheet under may back seat cushion. Take it out carefully, as the paper is more than 50 years old! But having the original is really cool! As I recall, there was also one placed under the driver seat cushion. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good boy for speaking up!
Did you get or got the title for the car? very important before you do much of anything!
And you need to get it registered in your name! ASAP
It's your legacy now as it should be!
Did your uncle not tell you anything about the car/engine?
I would think he would have tried to get it running.
Maybe you should ask him...
Good boy for speaking up!
Did you get or got the title for the car? very important before you do much of anything!
And you need to get it registered in your name! ASAP
It's your legacy now as it should be!
Did your uncle not tell you anything about the car/engine?
I would think he would have tried to get it running.
Maybe you should ask him...
yes I got all the paperwork signed and in my name once it got back up to NY. He didn’t really say much unfortunately but I had a few people come over who are knowledgeable and a couple of them said they do believe it may be a Malibu so the first thing I really wanted to do was figure out what it was originally
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry about your dad. What's the dash look like?
I wil
Welcome! You now have a pretty badass car.. as well as a new hobby 🙂

This is for sure the right place to get info about these cars.

One thing I just happened to notice right away is, the breather is missing from the passenger side valve cover. Not a big deal (it's a very inexpensive part).. just happened to see it.

I would be careful starting it up for the first time (unless somebody already did). Others will have more experience / knowledge than I do around how necessary this is, but if I were to do it myself, I'd probably change the oil and then prime the oil pump before starting (using a special tool that attaches to a drill and goes down the distributor hole). I would imagine the bearings are probably a little dry by now.

Also, unless you know for sure that it has a roller cam, I would add the zinc additive to your oil. Before.. the 90s?.. oil came with zinc to protect flat tappet cams, but it doesn't have that today.
Thank you so much for the advice and tips. I assumed that the first thing to do after identifying what it was originally was take the oil and gas and any old fluid out. Thanks so much
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry for your loss of your dad, and I'm happy you have an interest in getting his classic car going. Your memories of your dad will be strengthened over time when you enjoy his old Chevelle.

Sitting for 15 years is never a good thing for a car, but that doesn't ruin it either. It is going to take some elbow grease and some money to get her going again, but that car looks like it will be worth it. You don't say how good your mechanical aptitude is - but you will enjoy learning as you go! I would try to get it running first off and work from there.

I would start by getting all the old gas out of the system as you could possibly do more harm than good by trying to run it on that old, varnished gas. If it hasn't been cranked over after 15 years, there is probably nothing left in the carburetor, so drop the gas tank, empty it, then flush some new gas thru it, then reinstall. Then it will take some cranking to get the new fuel up to fill the carburetor, so be patient.

You'll need to be weary of fluid leaks from old hoses. This means gas leaks, antifreeze leaks, brake line leaks, automatic tranny lines, and so on. If you do get it running again, after that you can concentrate on what it will take to make it a safe car to drive.

Your car has SS badges on it, but that does not mean it came from the factory as a SS car. Anybody could have put SS badging on a lesser model Chevelle to make it look like a real SS. There is no easy way to tell on a 70 if it was born that way unless you have documentation matching the cars VIN with the build sheet. Hopefully - maybe - your dad had that documentation. If not - no biggy. You will still enjoy your dad's old classic car, no matter how it was built at the factory.

Welcome to Tean Chevelle and enjoy your new hobby!
I really appreciate the advice you are 100% right I had a few people come over and they did say they believe it may be a Malibu. A gentleman came over and told me it may be possible to find out if I reached out to them in Canada? He also lifted the hood and found a small plate with info on it and told me that could help as well. Regardless of what it is I just wanna get it back so my dad could be proud of it. A question I have if you don’t mind is how do I know how much money to put into a car like this? Thanks for your feedback
 

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Regardless of what it is I just wanna get it back so my dad could be proud of it. A question I have if you don’t mind is how do I know how much money to put into a car like this?
I don't know who could answer that question right now. The good thing is (unless you plan on making this car your everyday driver - which I don't think you are doing) the car will wait for you until you are able to afford spending money on it. Like we all have said - work on getting it running, then getting it to a point where it is a safe and drivable car. Then enjoy the fun of driving your classic car around town and to cruise nights. As time goes on you will decide what other things you may want to do to your new ride, as finances allow.
At age 25 you have your whole adult life in front of you. To live your life with your dads Chevelle at your side should be quite the unique journey!
 
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Whatever you think you will spend on completely redoing the car double that and you MAY be close.

I agree, get it running, driving & safe and the car will tell you what it wants.
 

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Congrats!!!!!! Read/ research/ study/ document what you have. What work has been done to it. Don’t drive down muddy dirt roads! Enjoy what you have. Some people (like me) have slowly been working on their cars their whole life.
 
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This.

You can learn as you go. I wouldn't try to treat it like anything close to a daily driver, even in summer (I don't even risk letting mine get rained on, as there are places water can sit and cause rust)..

I'm guessing it actually is a Malibu with an SS grille / hood, as the engine in it is a small block and the emblem says "cowl induction", which doesn't appear to be present. That's not really a big issue in my mind, though. If you look at the Chevelles on the road today, you'd think the SS was the only trim package they had.. but in reality, they were a small minority.

The project can be as fast or slow as you want (or can afford). Circumstances also change as you go through life. At 25, I couldn't conceive of being able to afford an extra car, but now it's no big deal.
 
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