Porcelain or Ceramic Tile - Chevelle Tech
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post #1 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 3:52 PM Thread Starter
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Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Which is better for a bathroom floor? Which is easiest to care for?

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post #2 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 4:23 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain will be best overall. I think it's stronger and less likely to absorb water and stains.

Make sure you get proper underlayment (consider crack isolation especially on wood subfloor) also get good grout sealed will withstand discoloration better and be easy to clean in the long run.

We just did our entire downstairs in 9 x 48 porcelain tile and the company had to do it twice due to poor installation methods that I caught them doing so I became very knowledgable about tile.
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post #3 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 4:57 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

The local folks here did my bathroom, they did all the right stuff on the tile. They also used an epoxy grout so zero maintenance.
If its not to late get heated floors installed. Love them in the wintertime.

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post #4 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 5:00 PM
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Porcelain will withstand water better than ceramic. Use the latex modified mortar and grout. If it’s the second floor use a 3/8” plywood underlayment if your door transition will allow.
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post #5 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 6:11 PM
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Both are fine for that application, imo. Porcelain is generally more durable, but not an issue in a residential application. The grout lines are going to be your issue in cleaning and maintaining. Sealing and maintaining the sealant often will help with mildew and staining.

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post #6 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 7:10 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain seems to be the most popular the last few years, for both residential and commercial. That said we used plain old ceramic in our baths and the entire rental kitchen and dining. Bullitproof so far. x2 on sealing the tile and grout for future cleaning.
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post #7 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 7:26 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain is a harder tile and less susceptible to chips than ceramic. All depends on budget, look and if you still have little ones.
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post #8 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 19, 7:55 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain is much stronger than ceramic and will not crack as easy.
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post #9 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 19, 10:58 AM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldcutlass View Post
Porcelain is much stronger than ceramic and will not crack as easy.
If it's installed properly cracks won't be an issue. You can install dinner plates on the floor and if done right you wouldn't get a crack in 20 years of hard use. . I installed tile for a living for over 30 years (retired) and my vote would be for porcelain because it's a much harder and denser product.
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post #10 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 19, 12:52 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Porcelain tile is harder to cut during install. I ended up using my electric tile saw on ALL the cuts
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post #11 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 7th, 19, 2:12 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Quote:
Originally Posted by SFD View Post
... If itís the second floor use a 3/8Ē plywood underlayment if your door transition will allow.
Plywood is sometimes needed for additional structural support but in itself makes for a poor underlayment for tile. If one bonds a tile with good thinset to a piece of plywood and another with same thinset to concrete the tile that was bonded to plywood can be pried up in one piece. The tile that was bonded to concrete with have to be pulverized to be removed. Won't be able to get up a piece larger than a bottle cap. Cement board underlayment will provide way better bonding abilities. Of course there is a correct way to install the cement board as well, improperly installed can cause problems as well. Then there are special underlayments for tile such as Ditra which would be an advantage if floor height is a concern.
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Last edited by davewho1; Jan 8th, 19 at 6:44 PM. Reason: fixed quote
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post #12 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 19, 9:06 AM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Quote:
Originally Posted by PHX396 View Post
Porcelain is a harder tile and less susceptible to chips than ceramic. All depends on budget, look and if you still have little ones.
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldcutlass View Post
Porcelain is much stronger than ceramic and will not crack as easy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blm View Post
Plywood is sometimes needed for additional structural support but in itself makes for a poor underlayment for tile. If one bonds a tile with good thinset to a piece of plywood and another with same thinset to concrete the tile that was bonded to plywood can be pried up in one piece. The tile that was bonded to concrete with have to be pulverized to be removed. Won't be able to get up a piece larger than a bottle cap. Cement board underlayment will provide way better bonding abilities. Of course there is a correct way to install the cement board as well, improperly installed can cause problems as well. Then there are special underlayments for tile such as Ditra which would be an advantage if floor height is a concern.
^^^^^^^^^That's what I used also.

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post #13 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 19, 9:40 AM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

Quote:
Originally Posted by blm View Post
Plywood is sometimes needed for additional structural support but in itself makes for a poor underlayment for tile. If one bonds a tile with good thinset to a piece of plywood and another with same thinset to concrete the tile that was bonded to plywood can be pried up in one piece. The tile that was bonded to concrete with have to be pulverized to be removed. Won't be able to get up a piece larger than a bottle cap.
I've done enough tear outs and repairs in my life time to disagree with your statement about tile over plywood. If bonded correctly the plywood comes up with the tile in most cases, it ain't a fun job. Getting tile off concrete is a breeze in comparison. If you don't use a good polymer modified mortar over plywood it won't stick right, PERIOD.

Edit: If you really want things to stick right there'a a product that been on the market for years made by Mapei. It's an acrylic additive for mixing with regular thin set mortar called Kerelastic. Years ago a customer wanted to tile a metal ships deck and it was done with this product and worked for at least 5 years that I know of. Tile ain't supposed to stick to metal but Kerelastic made it work. It's always been my go to for some extreme installations.

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post #14 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 19, 6:23 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

It's a small bathroom, 40 sf, and not heavily used. Base floor is OSB. Will it work to install tile directly on that?

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post #15 of 48 (permalink) Old Jan 8th, 19, 6:32 PM
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Re: Porcelain or Ceramic Tile

I wouldn't recommend any tile installation over OSB board. Kerelastic might work for it but I wouldn't take the chance. Me thinks if you do it you'll be doing it again.

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