: Kerosene forced air heater question.....


ToocoolZ28
Jan 5th, 12, 6:08 PM
I have an older (about 12 years) 50000btu Remington forced air bullet style heater. It works great but has not been used a great deal. Can I use diesel fuel in this heater? I've heard that most of these heaters can burn diesel and it burns cleaner with less odor.
There is a tag on the side thar says use only kerosene or "number 1 fuel oil", is this the same as diesel?
Thanks.
Ron

JWagner
Jan 5th, 12, 6:41 PM
I believe that Diesel is a #2 oil. And it probably has some additives to improve the way it works in a Diesel that may not be beneficial in a heater.

quikss
Jan 5th, 12, 6:52 PM
I have one that specifically says diesel on it and 7 others that say kerosene or #1 fuel oil on them and we put diesel in all of them. have to with the cost of kerosene around here. Only thing I dont like about diesel is after a full day, you can taste the diesel on your tongue.

Jeff

bulb122
Jan 5th, 12, 7:32 PM
K1 kerosene will burn cleaner than diesel. I also refuse to use the dyed kerosene. It stinks more, and will eventually gum up wicks, if you also have a wick style heater or lamp. I go through about 100 gallons of kerosene a year in various types of heaters and lamps, and I only use low sulfur K1 clear. (i get it at the local Speedway gas station)

MrBill66Malibu
Jan 5th, 12, 8:42 PM
Is this heater for your shop or the jobsite? If it is for your shop I suggest buying a used oil furnace and installing it. I have run mine of a 6 gal diesel can and it usually lasts 3 straight days of very cold temps (30F and under) and even longer in the warmer days. I hate the stink of kerosene heaters and it is not healthy to constantly breath those fumes. I go out to the shop 15 mins before and turn it on and it's nice and toasty when I come back, plus that furnace is much quieter!!! JMHO

ToocoolZ28
Jan 5th, 12, 8:59 PM
I bought this to use in my shop before I installed the central heat and a/c, now I use it occasionally in a friends garage to warm it up enough to have our car club meetings. We always eat at these meetings and the kerosene smell isnt exactly appetizing. I probably havent run more that 20-30 gallons total through it.The kerosene in the tank still burns good but its probably been in there for 3 years or so.
Guess maybe I should stick with the kerosene.

Ray Gasser
Jan 5th, 12, 9:08 PM
Follow the manufactures directions.
Ventilate well, everyone is breathing the exhaust.
Not worth taking chances....

PCB67SS
Jan 5th, 12, 9:15 PM
Follow the manufactures directions.
Ventilate well, everyone is breathing the exhaust.
Not worth taking chances....
I'm with Ray on this one.....You guys ever consider holding your club meeting at a local place to eat (pizza joint) when the weather is a little to cold for the shop?

quikss
Jan 6th, 12, 11:16 AM
I bought this to use in my shop before I installed the central heat and a/c, now I use it occasionally in a friends garage to warm it up enough to have our car club meetings. We always eat at these meetings and the kerosene smell isnt exactly appetizing. I probably havent run more that 20-30 gallons total through it.The kerosene in the tank still burns good but its probably been in there for 3 years or so.
Guess maybe I should stick with the kerosene.

I wouldnt want to eat anything that has diesel exhaust on it. Its not really a pleasant tasting thing.

Jeff

Dan1979
Jan 6th, 12, 6:31 PM
Trust me stay away from diesel. I do concrete and we have a 150,000 btu reddy heater. It will burn both but the oil stinks. When it starts it will blow black smoke and when it shuts off it will. Pay the extra and burn kero..We won't even use diesel to heat a detached garage because of the odor

quikss
Jan 6th, 12, 6:57 PM
Trust me stay away from diesel. I do concrete and we have a 150,000 btu reddy heater. It will burn both but the oil stinks. When it starts it will blow black smoke and when it shuts off it will. Pay the extra and burn kero..We won't even use diesel to heat a detached garage because of the odor

Im guessing your heaters arent set up at all for diesel fuel. I have 8 heaters here, the smallest one is 155,000 BTU and not a one of them blows any black smoke at all. I get soot from the heaters, but no smoke of any sorts. A heater thats working properly shouldnt blow any smoke at all until it runs out of fuel of any type.

The fumes from kerosene arent all that great either, and I especially wouldnt use kerosene in any enclosed application. We use our heaters during home and building rough-ins during the winter. Nothings enclosed yet so the fumes exit rapidly. I would never let my employees run any sort of kerosene heater where the fumes cant get out quickly

jeff

von
Jan 6th, 12, 7:25 PM
I burn diesel in my Remington heater and don't have any smoke, other than a slight puff of gray at start-up, and no excess smell that I notice. IMO it had more smell when I burned kero in it. I use it in my attached garage with no complaints from the wife, and she has a nose like a bloodhound. It does say on the heater that it can burn either kerosene or diesel.

Dan1979
Jan 6th, 12, 7:26 PM
Jeff its more on shut off..we never use them in a occupied house do to fumes and that chance of a hazard. Recently we can't even use it cause it died.. Lasted 17 yrs though

bulb122
Jan 6th, 12, 7:50 PM
A quick puff of smoke on startup is normal. My current Reddy 50,000btu heater has done this since new, as did the other brands and sizes that I've owned and used in the past.

While a keresone torpedo heater will never be stink free, one that is out of "tune" or has poor fuel will stink more than it should. A couple tips i've learned over time:
- Use fresh, quality, clear, kerosene. If it's not clear, it will smell more. A yellowish tint is sulfur, and stinks, badly. Dye can hide the color of the sulfur, and also make it's own stink. They make kerosene additives you can add to help keep out moisture, and some of the additives are scented (though I can't really say that I've noticed the scent over the kerosene fumes...). Moisture will cause poorer combustion, and smell. I've also read that the moisture can help promote some type of algae growth if stored for years on end. I've never experienced that though, and frankly, I don't see how anything could live in it??

- Make sure the heater is maintained. Almost all of them have air filters, and they do get clogged up from time to time. I believe this throws off the mixture a bit, causing poorer combustion.

- Some heaters have adjustable air bleeds to adjust the flame. Ideally, you want the metal disc in the end to glow completely, bright red/orange, with no flame coming out of the end, except the occasional flicker of a yellow flame tip getting past the disc. If it's a flamethower, or the disc doesn't glow fairly brightly or not at all, the flame isn't right. A non-glowing disc will smell very bad. You'll need to read the instructions for your heater on how to adjust, if it's even possible. One that I had in the past went so far as to specify putting a low PSI gage on a specific port on the back of the heater, and adjust the bleed to get a specific PSI (5 or 7, I can't remember, but that was likely specific for that brand/model)

Just my $0.02 :)

ToocoolZ28
Jan 6th, 12, 11:43 PM
Ok, I'm convinced, I bought fresh K1 today.
Thanks