: Carpenters, how hard would it be to raise this ceiling?


ToocoolZ28
Mar 16th, 11, 7:34 PM
My shop has 9 foot ceilings, I would like to raise it to 12 feet (hoping to fit a lift in there) I would just need to raise the middle part, about 10 feet wide. These pictures show the attic above which is just full of junk and I dont need that space. The attic is 10 feet wide down the middle and 8 feet high.The window is 3 feet off the floor so I could raise the floor up to the bottom of the window without messing with the outside at all. To me it doesnt look real complicated but I am no kind of carpenter. I do want to enclose it like it is now so I can have it insulated to heat and cool. The building is 24 feet wide by 32 feet deep.
Look at the pics here.

depley
Mar 16th, 11, 7:49 PM
From the pictures it appears as if you have factory built attic trusses which means you would have to remove the entire roofing deck, facias, gutters ceiling material. Then once all that is done you remove the trusses, each will come off as a whole width of the garage. Then you would have to rebuild the outside walls with 12 foot 2/6s, after removing what ever is on and in the walls now. Add sheathing to the raised height, then siding outside, refinish the inside walls after replace all wiring plumbing etc found in the walls currently. Put the roof trusses back on top of the walls (this is IF they pass current construction codes). Redeck, reroof, put up new facias, gutters etc etc.
Now what I cannot tell is how it is attached to the house and what raising it would do asthetically. Of course you may have subdivision covenents that would require approval.
Have I scared you off yet? You are talking one expensive 3 foot of wall!!!!!!!!!

CDN SS
Mar 16th, 11, 7:51 PM
As long as you dont change the original truss design I can t see any reason why you can't raise ceiling between the truss uprights ........ no problem

Alwhite00
Mar 16th, 11, 8:07 PM
I don't think you can just hack out the bottom stringer and raise it up - trusses are engineered to take a specific load and really can not be cut up very easily. I understand that you are thinking you can just raise the center up 3' and good to go, i don't think it is quite that simple. You might want to talk to a truss Mfg or someone that understands them, I'm guessing they will tell you no but I have seen stranger things done.

LK

Kim57
Mar 16th, 11, 8:07 PM
From the pictures it appears as if you have factory built attic trusses which means you would have to remove the entire roofing deck, facias, gutters ceiling material. Then once all that is done you remove the trusses, each will come off as a whole width of the garage. Then you would have to rebuild the outside walls with 12 foot 2/6s, after removing what ever is on and in the walls now. Add sheathing to the raised height, then siding outside, refinish the inside walls after replace all wiring plumbing etc found in the walls currently. Put the roof trusses back on top of the walls (this is IF they pass current construction codes). Redeck, reroof, put up new facias, gutters etc etc.
Now what I cannot tell is how it is attached to the house and what raising it would do asthetically. Of course you may have subdivision covenents that would require approval.
Have I scared you off yet? You are talking one expensive 3 foot of wall!!!!!!!!!
I think he only wants to raise the inside ceiling up 3 feet and not the whole building.
Kim

ToocoolZ28
Mar 16th, 11, 8:14 PM
I think he only wants to raise the inside ceiling up 3 feet and not the whole building.
KimYes Kim is correct, I just want to raise the center of the ceiling.

CDN SS
Mar 16th, 11, 8:18 PM
I agree check with a truss mfg, I could be dead wrong , but that design I beleive you can transfer the load up 3' build the new raised ceilings before you cut out the stringers ...............but again dbl check with a truss mfg. I doubt you are in a high snow load zone ??

ToocoolZ28
Mar 16th, 11, 8:25 PM
I agree check with a truss mfg, I could be dead wrong , but that design I beleive you can transfer the load up 3' build the new raised ceilings before you cut out the stringers ...............but again dbl check with a truss mfg. I doubt you are in a high snow load zone ??
Snow? We got a few inches this year, but its not a problem. I think I would be better off to check with a truss manufacturer like was suggested.

von
Mar 16th, 11, 8:35 PM
The trusses make it a little bit harder but the end result is like a recessed tray ceiling in a house. I think you'd need to run 2x6 joists from rafter to rafter at the new ceiling height to transfer the load to the rafters. Then for extra strength triangulate from the new joist/rafter juction point to the existing joist/vertical framing juction point (looks like that's already there).

77 cruiser
Mar 16th, 11, 8:42 PM
Any reason why you don't want to raise the whole building?

SMALLBLOC
Mar 16th, 11, 8:44 PM
The trusses make it a little bit harder but the end result is like a recessed tray ceiling in a house. I think you'd need to run 2x6 joists from rafter to rafter at the new ceiling height to transfer the load to the rafters. Then for extra strength triangulate from the new joist/rafter juction point to the existing joist/vertical framing juction point.

Thats it in a nutshell, finish all the redesign work, then cut out the old ceiling. No worry about loads from snow and a tornado will remove it all either way.

Ed.Camino
Mar 16th, 11, 9:17 PM
I don't think you can just hack out the bottom stringer and raise it up - trusses are engineered to take a specific load and really can not be cut up very easily. I understand that you are thinking you can just raise the center up 3' and good to go, i don't think it is quite that simple. You might want to talk to a truss Mfg or someone that understands them, I'm guessing they will tell you no but I have seen stranger things done.

LK

A Truss manufacturer would not just say no, but HELL NO !
It might be possible the trusses could be modified to accomplish what you want but it would take an engineer to do it right.

CDN SS
Mar 16th, 11, 9:25 PM
The trusses make it a little bit harder but the end result is like a recessed tray ceiling in a house. I think you'd need to run 2x6 joists from rafter to rafter at the new ceiling height to transfer the load to the rafters. Then for extra strength triangulate from the new joist/rafter juction point to the existing joist/vertical framing juction point (looks like that's already there).


Exactly .you explained it well

I was just kidding about the snow load in Tn :D:D

dabadas
Mar 16th, 11, 9:54 PM
dont get discouraged it can be done right in the center the floor of the upstairs will go up the 3 feet and tied back in contact a local contractor to come out and look at it

elcamino66
Mar 16th, 11, 10:05 PM
Put a beam under the uprights the top 3 pics show to support the load of the trusses. I would just raise the ceiling where the lift will be. That would be much simpler and you would still have some of the room upstairs. That way the beam would not have to be so long and be much cheaper. After the beams are in you could cut out the ceiling without any problems.

DONTWANT2
Mar 16th, 11, 10:09 PM
A guy locally here just done it and it looks nice.He went back from the overhead door i think about 10 feet. then went 5 trusses. He then went on the roof laid it out and cut outside the 2 trusses and cut the roof sheeting from one eve to the other. I think he added 2 trusses before he lifted the roof on the outside of his cut line. Then he built some bracing and jacked the center section up 4.5 feet. Then installed a 4 foot knee-wall on both sides, lowered the roof back down,filled the gables,sided it and it looks great. took him about 3 weeks. It was just him and a couple of buddies working part time on it. I could probably get you a few picks if you would like to see it. Just pm me and i will stop over and get you a couple.

The way he done it he didnt have to tear down any of the garage.. Jut the labor, and the material to build the knee-wall and fill in the gables. and just a few square of siding. It would probably be a good idea to get someone with some good knowledge to look at it before you start cutting though.

But i would think if you just wanted to remove the ceiling in the center it should go quite easy. You may get by cutting out the center of a few trusses but i would think you would want to double up a couple at each end all the way across the garage at each end of the opening. Then tie from one full joist to the other end all the way across the new opening to tie it all back together. A look from someone with a little engineering background might be a good idea befor you start cutting though.......

1BLACKHARLEY
Mar 16th, 11, 11:54 PM
Before you do anything, go down to building and safety and ask. It may very well be an easy project, but if it doesn't meet code, your screwed. Always make nice with the city. minimally you'll need some type of rough plan, but what your going to really find out, is that anytime you change something structually enginered, theres going to be more involved, and if the city catches you, it isn't like your wife where it's easier to ask forgiveness, they will shut you down and fine the crap out of you.

My wife works for building and safety, her advice, go down and ask, you may find in your area has no code at all (not likely) but the least is to get an improvement permit, but it will probably be more complicated and plans will be involved. These guys may be right, on how easy it is, but that doesn't mean the city won't want thier share...

mochevy69
Mar 17th, 11, 12:15 AM
Might be easier and more cost effective to do a GREASE PIT! I raised the roof in my shop 4 ft. when I got my 4 post lift. BUT, my trusses were configured the other direction. I only had to modify two.

ToocoolZ28
Mar 17th, 11, 11:05 AM
Might be easier and more cost effective to do a GREASE PIT! I raised the roof in my shop 4 ft. when I got my 4 post lift. BUT, my trusses were configured the other direction. I only had to modify two.
It may be cheaper but I just dont like a grease pit.

vinsales
Mar 17th, 11, 11:48 AM
ron, your garage is very similar to mine. mine is 21 x 32 and it had 10 ft ceilings. i wanted a lift so i vaulted the ceiling in the middle. mine was very easy but i did not have trusses, it was stick built. me and a couple of buddies did it in less than 8 hrs. first we removed about 3 ft of roofing shingles on one side. then we cut out about 2 ft of roof deck plywood. next we slid in 2x8 collar ties and nailed them rafter to rafter. then we installed hangers(2x6) from rafters to the existing floor joist. next we cut the floor joists out between the hangers. next install plywood flooring on top of new collar ties (now floor joists). replace roof deck. replace shingles and presto, one 12 1/2 ft vaulted ceiling. the vaulted area is about 18 ft from front to back and it's about centered front to back so you still keep a lot of the original structure intact. because you have trusses, i would install appropriate laminated beams from your front wall to the rear wall under the ceiling where the hangers are located. i live in new hampshire and we get tons of snow and no problems whatsoever. good luck!

animal69
Mar 17th, 11, 5:54 PM
Don't do anything without consulating a truss engineer!